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Intriguing

Sunday, 26 October

8:30-17:00 Full day

Workshop 23: Open-Source in an Industrial Context

8:30-12:00 Morning

Tutorial 4: Introduction to Aspect-Oriented Programming with AspectJ

13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Tutorial 10: Advanced Aspect-Oriented Programming with AspectJ

Monday, 27 October

8:30-17:00 Full day

Workshop 5: The Twelfth OOPSLA Workshop on Behavioral Semantics— Striving for Simplicity
Workshop 22: Web Services and Service-Oriented Architecture Best Practices and Patterns

8:30-12:00 Morning

Tutorial 23: Beyond the Gang of Four

13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Tutorial 28: Enterprise Integration Patterns

Wednesday, 29 October

13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Tutorial 44: Notes on the Forgotten Art of Software Architecture

23 Open-Source in an Industrial Context

Sunday, 26 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Manfred Broy, Technische Universität München, broy@in.tum.de
Thomas Wieland, University of Applied Sciences Coburg, thomas@drwieland.de
Marc Sihling, 4Soft GmbH, sihling@in.tum.de

Open-Source software development moved into the focus of common interest a couple of years ago and by now, software engineers learned a lot about the dos and don'ts which often prove beneficial even for industrial software development projects. However, there are many more ways in which industrial software development can benefit from open-source communities — and vice versa.

In this workshop, we will elaborate on different aspects that help to establish this mutual benefit.

http://osic.in.tum.de/

4 Introduction to Aspect-Oriented Programming with AspectJ

Sunday, 26 October – 8:30-12:00 Morning

Erik Hilsdale, PARC, hilsdale@parc.com
Jim Hugunin, PARC, hugunin@parc.com

AspectJ is a seamless, aspect-oriented extension to Java™. It can be used to cleanly modularize the crosscutting structure of concerns such as exception handling, multi-object protocols, synchronization, performance optimizations, and resource sharing.

When implemented in a non-aspect-oriented fashion, the code for these concerns typically becomes spread out across the program. AspectJ controls such code-tangling and makes the underlying concerns more apparent, making programs easier to develop and maintain.

This tutorial will introduce Aspect-oriented programming and show how to use AspectJ to implement crosscutting concerns in a concise, modular way. We will also demonstrate and use AspectJ's integration with IDEs such as JBuilder, NetBeans, Emacs, and Eclipse, in addition to the core AspectJ tools.

AspectJ is freely available at http://eclipse.org/aspectj.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Attendees should have experience doing object-oriented design and implementation, and should be able to read and write Java code. No prior experience with aspect-oriented programming or AspectJ is required.

Format

Lecture and demonstration

Presenters

Erik Hilsdale is a researcher at the Palo Alto Research Center. As a member of the AspectJ team, he concentrated on language design, pedagogy and compiler implementation. He has written several conference and workshop publications in programming languages. He is an experienced and energetic instructor in programming languages and has much background in AspectJ.

Jim Hugunin is a researcher at the Palo Alto Research Center. He built the first Java-based AspectJ compiler and led the subsequent implementation work up to a 1.1 release of the compiler and core tools. He also played a major role in the design of the AspectJ language. Prior to joining the AspectJ team he designed and implemented JPython/Jython, a widely used implementation of the Python language for the Java platform.

10 Advanced Aspect-Oriented Programming with AspectJ

Sunday, 26 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Erik Hilsdale, PARC, hilsdale@parc.com
Jim Hugunin, PARC, hugunin@parc.com

This tutorial will provide involved hands-on programming exercises that both use some of AspectJ's advanced features, and feature AspectJ used in advanced contexts. We will show how AspectJ can be used to solve problems in instrumentation (including logging), testing, quality management, and feature management. In addition, advanced parts of the AspectJ design and implementation will be introduced, along with discussions of possible future features. Exercises will use the core AspectJ tools and IDEs.

AspectJ is freely available at http://eclipse.org/aspectj.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Knowledge of Java and some familiarity and experience with AspectJ, equivalent to the material covered in tutorial 4.

Format

Lecture and hands-on exercises

Presenters

Erik Hilsdale is a researcher at the Palo Alto Research Center. As a member of the AspectJ team, he concentrated on language design, pedagogy and compiler implementation. He has written several conference and workshop publications in programming languages. He is an experienced and energetic instructor in programming languages and has a long history with AspectJ.

Jim Hugunin is a researcher at the Palo Alto Research Center. He built the first Java-based AspectJ compiler and led the subsequent implementation work up to a 1.1 release of the compiler and core tools. He also played a major role in the design of the AspectJ language. Prior to joining the AspectJ team, he designed and implemented JPython/Jython, a widely used implementation of the Python language for the Java platform.

5 The Twelfth OOPSLA Workshop on Behavioral Semantics— Striving for Simplicity

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Haim Kilov, Independent Consultant and Stevens Institute of Technology, haimk@acm.org
Kenneth Baclawski, Northeastern University, ken@baclawski.com

The goal of this workshop is to foster precise, explicit, and elegant OO specifications of business and system semantics, independently of any (possible) realization. Substantial progress has been made in these areas, both in academia and in industry. However, in too many cases only lip service to semantic issues has been provided, and as a result the systems we build or buy are all too often excessively complex or (this is not an exclusive or) are not what they are supposed to be. Doing better than that requires both a clear understanding of the problem semantics within the context of their business and technological environments, and an abstract, precise and explicit specification of that semantics.

The specific theme this year is on striving for simplicity. In order to simplify IT systems, we need to use abstraction — in C.A.R.Hoare's words, "only abstraction enables a manager or a chief programmer to exert real technical control". The same considerations apply to understanding, modeling and making (strategic, tactical and operational) decisions about businesses.

http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/kenb/oopsla2003

22 Web Services and Service-Oriented Architecture Best Practices and Patterns

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Ali Arsanjani, IBM Corporation, arsanjan@us.ibm.com
Kerrie Holley, IBM, holley@us.ibm.com

Web services and service-oriented architectures are promising technology. However, they are still fraught with problems and issues: operational issues, quality of service, functional and methodology related.

In this workshop we aim to identify real industry experiences (successes or failures) in designing and implementing web services based systems. And we look for research papers aiming at identifying and alleviating major bottlenecks and issues related to service-oriented architectures, web services and dynamically re-configurable architectures.

This workshop builds on the Object Oriented Web Services workshops in previous OOPSLA conferences and sets a slightly different direction, aimed at consolidating web services and service-oriented architecture best practices and patterns.

http://www.arsanjani.com/oopsla2003/webservices.htm

23 Beyond the Gang of Four

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-12:00 Morning

Frank Buschmann, Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, Frank.Buschmann@siemens.com
Kevlin Henney, Curbralan Ltd., kevlin@curbralan.com

When software developers mention design patterns, the chances are that they are talking about Design Patterns, the classic book by the Gang of Four, rather than design patterns in general. Even when they are talking about the pattern concept, as opposed to specific patterns, they often think in terms of the form and idea presented in GoF, and rarely beyond.

Since the publication of the seminal work by the GoF in 1994, however, a great deal of research and practice in patterns has led to a better understanding of both the pattern concept and the strengths and weaknesses of the GoF patterns themselves.

This tutorial revisits the GoF patterns, reflects on them, deconstructs them, and re-evaluates them from the practitioner's perspective: why patterns such as Abstract Factory, Builder, Flyweight, Command, and others are missing a vital ingredient to be proper parts of an architectural vocabulary; why Iterator is not always the best solution for traversing aggregates; why State is not the only state pattern; why some patterns, such as Bridge, are more than one pattern; and what you can do about it.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Sound knowledge of the pattern concept and the GoF patterns are required.

Format

Interactive lecture

Presenters

Frank Buschmann is senior principal engineer at Siemens Corporate Technology in Munich, Germany. His interests include Object Technology, Frameworks and Patterns. Frank has been involved in many software development projects. He is leading Siemens' pattern research activities. Frank is co-author of "Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture -- A System of Patterns" and "Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture -- Patterns for Concurrent and Networked Objects".

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant and trainer. The focus of his work is in programming languages, OO, CBD, UML, patterns, and software architecture. He is a regular columnist for C/C++ Users Journal (online), Application Development Advisor (UK), and JavaSpektrum (Germany), and previously wrote columns in Java Report and C++ Report. He is also a member of the advisory board for Hillside Europe, the program chair for EuroPLoP 2003, and a popular speaker at conferences in the US and Europe.

28 Enterprise Integration Patterns

Monday, 27 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Bobby Woolf, Independent Consultant, woolf@acm.org
Gregor Hohpe, ThoughtWorks, Inc., gregor@hohpe.com

It's no longer enough to be able to develop fantastic applications; now they have to be able to coordinate with each other as well. Whether your sales application must interface with your inventory application, your procurement application must integrate with an auction site, or your PDAs PIM must synchronize with the corporate calendar server, just about any application can be made better by integrating it with other applications. Customers expect an integrated, single-application experience, regardless of how internal functionality may be split across applications, so applications must be integrated.

This tutorial will teach you how to use messaging to integrate applications effectively by presenting a set of patterns--best practices that have been proven over time in a variety of integration projects. These patterns will teach you how to use message-based communication successfully.

This tutorial is based on technology-agnostic patterns and applies to a variety of messaging technologies, ranging from the Java Message Service (JMS) API in J2EE, and the System.Messaging namespace in Microsoft .NET, to enterprise application integration (EAI) and middleware products from vendors such as IBM, TIBCO, WebMethods, SeeBeyond, Vitria and others.

Attendee background

This tutorial is intended for enterprise application architects, designers, and developers who have basic familiarity with messaging tools and technologies, but wish to learn how best to use messaging to achieve enterprise application integration, and wish to be able to better communicate about these issues.

Prerequisites: Basic familiarity with messaging tools and technologies.

Format

Lecture

Presenters

Bobby Woolf has been developing multi-tier object-oriented business applications for thirteen years using Java/J2EE, Smalltalk, and embedded systems for messaging, workflow, business rules, and persistence. One of his specialties is developing architectures that integrate workflow, EJB, and JMS. He has presented tutorials at OOPSLA and JavaEdge, published articles in Java Developer's Journal and on the DeveloperWorks web site, published patterns in all of the PLoPD books, and is a co-author of The Design Patterns Smalltalk Companion. He is also a co-author of the upcoming book "Enterprise Integration Patterns" from Addison-Wesley.

Gregor Hohpe leads the Enterprise Integration Services competency at ThoughtWorks, Inc., a provider of application development and integration services. Over the past years, he has been helping clients around the globe design and implement enterprise integration solutions. His current work focuses on the application of agile methods and design patterns to the development of integration solutions. Gregor is a frequent speaker at technical conferences and has published a number of articles presenting a no-hype view on enterprise integration, Web services and Service-Oriented Architectures. He is a co-author of the upcoming book "Enterprise Integration Patterns."

44 Notes on the Forgotten Art of Software Architecture

Wednesday, 29 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Frank Buschmann, Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, Frank.Buschmann@siemens.com

Quality software systems require quality software architectures. Otherwise it is hard, if not impossible, to meet their functional and non-functional requirements and to master their inherent complexity. For instance, software architectures for systems with end-to-end quality of service demands, systems with stringent security requirements, or systems that are supposed to be in operation for 20+ years cannot be created on the fly, using contemporary middleware and tools. Instead, these architectures must be crafted with care, following a defined specification process and making thoughtful design decisions.

This tutorial explores some of the timeless secrets of building high-quality software architectures, in terms of process, methodology, design goals, and architectural properties, to convey the foundations of building successful software.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Participants must have experience with object-oriented software design and development.

Format

Lecture

Presenter

Frank Buschmann is senior principal engineer at Siemens Corporate Technology in Munich, Germany. His interests include Object Technology, Frameworks and Patterns. Frank has been involved in many software development projects. He is leading Siemens' pattern research activities. Frank is co-author of "Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture -- A System of Patterns" and "Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture -- Patterns for Concurrent and Networked Objects."