Workshops Full Description

Sunday

The JiniTM Pattern Language
Convention Ctr – 203A
Organizers:
Michael Kircher, Siemens AG, Michael.Kircher@mchp.siemens.de
Prashant Jain, Siemens AG
Kirthika Parameswaran, Washington University

This workshop will attempt to identify the patterns and pattern language embodied by Jini™ Technology. This pattern language will then be used to propose an architecture that can be used to implement Jini-like frameworks using technologies other than Java™. The goal of the workshop will be to document and to improve Jini architectural concepts in the form of patterns and their resulting pattern languages. Such patterns and pattern languages are useful for describing key technologies, such as ad hoc networking, as well as key concepts, such as fault tolerance, load balancing, and component architectures.

URL: http://www.cs.wustl.edu/~mk1/AdHocNetworking

Tracks: Distributed Objects; Patterns and Frameworks

Component Architectures
Convention Ctr – 203B
Organizers:
Steffen Schaefer, IBM EMEA Component Technology Services, steffens@acm.org
Wolfgang Berger, IBM EMEA Component Technology Services
Alan Cameron Wills, Trireme International Ltd

This workshop will discuss various component architectures that participants have designed and implemented in the real world. It is assumed that, in most cases, an underlying infrastructure has been used, such as JavaBeans, EJB, or DCOM, and that domain-related components have been implemented on top of these. The workshop will investigate the structure, principles, and implementation guidelines of the domain-related components. The outcome will be a set of rules (of thumb) for what works and what does not work in the arena of component architectures.

URL: http://www.trireme.com/oopsla/cmpt-arch

Tracks: Architecture; Components

Ninth OOPSLA Workshop on Behavioral Semantics
Convention Ctr – 213A
Organizers:
Haim Kilov, Genesis Development Corporation, haimk@acm.org
Kenneth Baclawski, Northeastern University

The purpose of this workshop is to improve the understanding and use of precise semantics in object-oriented specifications and designs. The goal is to bring together theoreticians and practitioners to report their experiences with making semantics precise, clear, concise, and explicit in object-oriented business specifications, business designs, and system specifications. Papers can range from academic research to industrial “war stories.” The workshop continues the tradition of eight previous OOPSLA workshops. The specific objectives this year are to examine the semantics of e-commerce, in particular, e-commerce agents, and to debate the impact of eXtreme Programming and extreme modeling on precise semantics.

URL: http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/kenb/oopsla2000

Track: Analysis and Design

Envisioning the System – The Craft of Exploring Problem and Solution Space
Convention Ctr – 204B
Organizers:
Martine Devos, EDS EMEA, martine.devos@eds.com
Ralph Hodgson, IBM Consulting Group

System Envisioning is a creative process for establishing the viability of innovative system concepts and technologies. The ability to design depends partly on being able to visualize something internally, in the “mind’s eye.”

This workshop will address such questions as how we communicate these images, and how we share “understanding” and vision. We will explore ways to optimize the intersection of problem space (as conceived by customers) and solution space (opportunities and technological potential). We will produce a “craftsman’s handbook,” a collection of techniques and methods for system envisioning.

URL: http://c2.com:8040/SystemEnvisioning

Track: Analysis and Design

Experiences with Autonomous Mobile Objects and Agent-based Systems
Convention Ctr – 206A
Organizers:
Anand Tripathi, University of Minnesota, tripathi@cs.umn.edu
Mehmet Aksit, University of Twente
Raju Pandey, University of California Davis
Neeran Karnik, IBM Research

The objective of this workshop is to bring together active and leading researchers working in the area of autonomous mobile objects and agent systems to share their experiences and define the important research directions in this field. In recent years, there has been a widespread surge of interest in mobile objects and agent systems. Even though a large number of mobile object/agent systems have been developed in recent years, there is a lack of collective assessment of our experience with this new paradigm for distributed computing. The objective of this workshop is to fill this gap.

URL: http://www.cs.umn.edu/~tripathi/Workshop.html

Tracks: Agents; Distributed Objects; Emerging Technologies

Implementation and Application of ObjectOriented Workflow Management Systems III
Convention Ctr – 206B
Organizers:
Fred Cummins, EDS, fred.cummins@eds.com
Christoph Bussler, Netfish Technologies
Steve Marney, EDS
Santanu Paul, Viveca Software

With Internet/intranet accessibility, emerging industry standards, and increased demand for inter-enterprise integration, current workflow management systems must undergo major changes to respond to a changing market, provide flexible, scaleable implementations, and support multinational organizations. Workflow management also has the potential to provide a flexible context in which to integrate enterprise applications and to manage the integration of heterogeneous system components to compose enterprise applications from more discrete, heterogeneous system components. These systems will enable the further integration of agent technology and process improvement tools. This workshop will explore the potential of workflow management and the technology needed to realize this potential.

URL: Check OOPSLA 2000 website for details.

Track: Business Objects

Mining Pedagogical Patterns
Convention Ctr – 207A
Organizers:
Jutta Eckstein, Objects in Action, jeckstein@acm.org
Helen Sharp, City University
Mary Lynn Manns, University of North Carolina at Asheville

The aim of the Pedagogical Patterns Project is to capture experiences of learning and teaching object technology. We see patterns as a possibility for achieving this experience capture. The contributions to the project that have been collected cover a wide spectrum and come from a variety of backgrounds. At a previous workshop at EuroPLoP, we developed a mind map that shows the category and disciplines that pedagogical patterns should cover. This will form the basis for mining the patterns in the existing material. This workshop differs from both a regular pattern workshop and a pattern-mining workshop because the original authors will not be present and we will mine patterns from existing proto-patterns.

URL: http://www.soi.city.ac.uk/~hsharp/OOPSLA2000.htm

Tracks: Education; Patterns and Frameworks

Best-practices in Business Rule Design and Implementation
Convention Ctr – 207B
Organizers:
Ali Arsanjani, IBM, arsanjan@us.ibm.com
Joseph Yoder, The Refactory, Inc.

Writing scalable, robust, and adaptable business rules for today’s e-business and n-tier architectures is a challenge. In this workshop, we categorize and capture, in pattern format, the best and successful practices. We will also describe anti-patterns scenarios in which business rule design has failed.

URL: http://www.mum.edu/cs_dept/aarsanjani/oopsla2000/business-rules.html

Track: Business Objects, Patterns and Frameworks

Enterprise Frameworks: Adequacies and Inadequacies
Convention Ctr – 212A
Organizers:
Mohamed Fayad, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, fayad@cse.unl.edu
Wolfgang Pree, University of Constance
David Hamu, TRW
Davide Brugali, Politecnico di Torino

This workshop will examine object-oriented enterprise frameworks (OOEFs) with respect to three central questions:
  • How can we achieve bottom-line improvements with enterprise frameworks?
  • What are the economical impacts of OOEFs nationally and globally?
  • What is the strategic analysis of enterprise framework investments?

The workshop will debate the strategic budgetary, marketing, technical, and managerial advantages of OOEFs, and will debate the broader economic impact of the enterprise and application frameworks on the organization, at national and international levels.

URL: http://www.cse.unl.edu/~fayad/workshops/oopsla2000/ws/

Track: Patterns and Frameworks

Refining the Practices of eXtreme Programming
Convention Ctr – 209A
Organizers:
Ken Auer, RoleModel Software, kauer@rolemodelsoft.com
Ward Cunningham, Cunningham & Cunningham

Although eXtreme Programming (XP) is still an enigma to many in the industry, hundreds have successfully put it into practice. This workshop will be a place where those practitioners can come together to challenge and encourage each other as they share what they’ve been doing and where they are going and work together to refine their art. Rather than introduce or defend XP, we will be working together to examine what works and what doesn’t work, and to determine how to improve the practice and enlarge the applicable domain.

URL: http://www.rolemodelsoft.com/OOPSLA2000/xp

Tracks: Process and Methodology; Software Engineering; XP

From Moderate Programming to eXtreme Programming
Convention Ctr – 209B
Organizers:
Jeff Canna, RoleModel Software, jcanna@rolemodelsoft.com
Michael Feathers, Object Mentor

This workshop is a place where people new to eXtreme Programming will be able to share experiences. It provides an avenue for people who have practiced some of the eXtreme Programming methodologies to get together and share their experiences. Each person in the workshop will review position papers and provide comments to the authors. During the day this workshop will, for a short time, be joining the “Refining the Practices of eXtreme Programming” workshop for a joint activity.

URL: http://www.rolemodelsoft.com/OOPSLA2000/modtoxp/proposal.htm

Tracks: Process and Methodology; XP; Software Engineering

Introducing Patterns (or any new idea) into Organizations
Convention Ctr – 210A
Organizers:
Mary Lynn Manns, University of North Carolina at Asheville, manns@unca.edu
Alan O’Callaghan, DeMontfort University
Linda Rising

Introducing any new technology or idea, such as patterns, into an organization can be difficult. Therefore, the problems and solutions for tackling this task are being captured in a pattern language called Introducing Patterns into Organizations. Work began on this language at OOPSLA‘96 and has continued throughout the past few years. The goal of this event is to mine more patterns. Participants will be encouraged to share experiences involving introducing patterns (or any new idea or technology) into an organization. They will be given the opportunity to draft their experiences into patterns that can then be added to this language.

URL: http://www.cs.unca.edu/~manns/oopsla_cfp.html

Tracks: Education; Patterns and Frameworks

Active Learning for Object-oriented Design
Convention Ctr – 210B
Organizers:
Robert Biddle, Victoria University of Wellington, robert@mcs.vuw.ac.nz
Rick Mercer, University of Arizona
Eugene Wallingford, University of Northern Iowa

Many people are introduced to object-oriented concepts, but only learn the words. This workshop will explore “active learning” techniques for object-oriented design, where innovative teaching strategies are used to allow learners to be actively engaged in design work from an early point. Our focus is on design mentoring and innovative active strategies; we will explore new techniques, new applications or extensions of well-known techniques, and case studies. The workshop will consist of presentations on these topics, and immediate active experimentation using the techniques.

URL: http://www.mcs.vuw.ac.nz/research/design1/

Tracks: Analysis and Design; Education

Methods and Tools for Object-Oriented Framework Development and Specialization
Convention Ctr – 204A
Organizers:
Kai Koskimies, Tampere University of Technology, kk@cs.tut.fi
Jan Bosch, University of Karlskrona/Ronneby
Wolfgang Pree, University of Constance
Hanspeter Moessenboeck, University of Linz, Austria

Object-oriented frameworks have become a popular form of reusable software. In particular, frameworks are exploited as architectural backbones of product families. Frameworks can provide an infrastructure for a set of compatible components, and a customizable component can be implemented as a framework. Although frameworks are recognized as a key technology supporting reusability, relatively little is known about the design and specialization methodologies for frameworks, and indeed about the character of a framework as a generic software unit. The purpose of the workshop is to discuss and compare existing approaches to manage object-oriented frameworks, covering both methodological and tool aspects.

URL: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~kk/oopsla2000.html

Track: Patterns and Frameworks

Software Aesthetics: Appreciating Code from the Past
Convention Ctr – 212B
Organizers:
Bruce Anderson, IBM and Wizard Systems, Bruce_Anderson@uk.ibm.com
Ralph Johnson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

We all know that software can be beautiful and that it is a thing to be appreciated for itself, though we often know that by experiencing the opposite. In this workshop we will look at some great and influential programs from the past, working directly with the code as text and in executing versions. We will spend time in small groups, and in plenary sessions, with plenty of time for discussion and telling stories. The outcome of the workshop will be both an appreciation of the works we have studied, and some elements of a theory or process for better appreciating code.

URL: http://st-www.cs.uiuc.edu/users/johnson/ProgramPreservation.htm

Track: Software Engineering

Component Contracts
Convention Ctr – 213B
Organizers:
John Daniels, Syntropy, Ltd., jdaniels@cix.co.uk
Laura Hill, Sun Microsystems

It’s fashionable to say that a component is specified by defining what it provides and what it requires. This workshop asks the following question: Does information about what a component requires form part of its contract with its clients? If we say “yes” then clients depend in some way on the downstream collaborations of the component and may be affected by changes to them. But if we say “no” we must ensure that the component’s interface definitions provide all of the information required by the client. The workshop will explore these issues by looking at the different contracts required by people playing different roles in the development process.

URL: http://www.syntropy.co.uk/oopslaworkshop

Track: Components


Monday

Pervasive Computing:The Next Generation Computing Environment
Convention Ctr – 203A
Organizers:
Mamdouh Ibrahim, IBM Global Services, mibrahim@us.ibm.com
John Baker, IBM Global Services
David Garlan, Carnegie Mellon University
Michael Karasick, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center
Peter Kriens, AQute/Ericsson
John Shelton, IBM Global Services

Hardware advances promise to deliver the power of computers everywhere, to everyone, at all times. This will require a new computing paradigm. This workshop will address challenges facing Pervasive Computing including:
  • Application models and development environment
  • Application footprint
  • Distributing (and garbage collecting) large numbers of objects
  • Management and administration of software components deployed on a large number of heterogeneous devices
  • Emerging and competing standards
  • Privacy and security
  • Supporting dramatically different user interface paradigms
  • Adaptability and learning
  • Networking infrastructure

URL: http://members.home.net/mamdouh/pervasiveworkshop.html

Tracks: Agents; Distributed Objects; Emerging Technologies

Advanced Separation of Concerns in Object-Oriented Systems
Convention Ctr – 204 A, B
Organizers:
Peri Tarr, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, tarr@watson.ibm.com
Lodewijk Bergmans, University of Twente
Martin Griss, Hewlett-Packard
Harold Ossher, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center

Separation of concerns can provide many well-known and crucial benefits, but only if the concerns that are separated and modularized match those one needs to deal with, which can be of dramatically different kinds in different development contexts and which evolve over time. Advanced approaches to separation of concerns must go beyond standard modularization mechanisms to facilitate:
  • Simultaneous separation of multiple, arbitrary kinds (dimensions) of concerns.
  • Support for cross-cutting, overlapping or interacting concerns.
  • Non-invasive evolution of concerns and kinds of concerns.
  • Sophisticated concern integration (composition/weaving) mechanisms.

This workshop is intended to bring together researchers and practitioners exploring this important area.

URL: http://trese.cs.utwente.nl/Workshops/OOPSLA2000

Tracks: Emerging Technologies; Software Engineering

Organization Patterns: Specific for Object-Oriented Development?
Convention Ctr – 203B
Organizers:
Martine Devos, EDS EMEA, martine.devos@eds.com
Stephen Berczuk, Verbind, Inc.
Alan O’Callaghan, De Montfort University

In this workshop, we try to understand more about software development organizations, and what makes them tick. Our goals include the following:
  • Learning new patterns of productive software development organizations
  • Learning how existing organization patterns interact to create highly productive software development organizations
  • Learning more about organizations that develop object-oriented software. How are they different from other development organizations? How are they similar? What organizational patterns apply chiefly to object-oriented development organizations? What patterns do not apply? Why?

URL: http://www.bell-labs.com/cgi-user/OrgPatterns/OrgPatterns

Tracks: Patterns and Frameworks; Process and Methodology

Revising the Java Thread Specification
Hilton – Duluth
Organizers:
William Pugh, University of Maryland, pugh@cs.umd.edu
Doug Lea, SUNY Oswego

Work is underway to completely replace the specification of threads in Java. Although this change will be backwards compatible with correctly synchronized programs, a lot of incorrectly synchronized code also exists. Revising the specification requires the determination of which thread communication idioms are valid. It also requires modification of existing JVM’s, allowing new compiler optimizations, which are illegal according to the existing semantics. At this workshop, we welcome proposals for the new specification. We will discuss proposed changes, gather feedback on existing proposals, and analyze the impact of proposals on performance and reliability.

URL: http://www.cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/workshop

Tracks: Java; Language and Implementations

Cancelled

Deploying Lightweight Processes
Convention Ctr – 206B
Organizers:
Jens Coldewey, Coldewey Consulting, jens_coldewey@acm.org
Pete McBreen, McBreen.Consulting
Jutta Eckstein, Objects in Action
Christa Schwanninger, Siemens

Besides knowing the nuts and bolts of lightweight processes, consultants also use a lot of tricks and techniques to help their clients switch from an old style of work to new ideas. The more radical the change, the harder it is to manage the resistance of some personnel and to end up with a successful project. This workshop aims to discuss and collect teaching and coaching techniques from experienced consultants.

URL: http://www.coldewey.com/publikationen/conferences/oopsla2000/deployment/

Track: Process and Methodology

Action Guides for the Software Architect
Convention Ctr – 210 A, B
Organizers:
Dana Bredemeyer, Bredemeyer Consulting, dana@bredemeyer.com
Ruth Malan, Bredemeyer Consulting
Bill Branson, Frank Russell Company

More and more organizations are establishing the role of “software architect,” recognizing that creating and deploying an architecture demands special talents and focus. In this workshop, we will develop a model of the role, responsibilities, and skills of an architect. These will be used to frame the Action Guides that will be produced in the workshop. Action Guides are targeted at some specific challenge that the architect faces. These challenges may be technical (e.g., how to model the architecture; how to document an interface) or non-technical (e.g., how to create an architecture vision; what to communicate to whom).

URL: http://www.bredemeyer.com/RoleWorkshop.htm

Track: Architecture

Business Object Components VI: Enterprise Application Integration
Convention Ctr – 213A
Organizers:
Jeff Sutherland, The Virtual Medicine Corporation, jeff.sutherland@computer.org
Dilip Patel, South Bank University
Joaquin Miller, Financial Systems Architects
Fred Cummins, EDS
Haim Kilov, Genesis Development Corporation

The NCITS T3 Open Distributed Processing (ODP) Group, and the Object Management Group Business Object Domain Task Force (BODTF) are jointly sponsoring the Sixth Annual OOPSLA Workshop on Business Object Component Design and Implementation. This year’s focus will be on design and implementation of business object component frameworks and architectures used for enterprise application integration (EAI). Enterprises are using an integrated intranet/extranet/Internet to link internal divisions, external partners, and customers to radically reduce costs while increasing value. This workshop will address such questions as the following: What role do business object components have in support of integration of the value chain?

URL: http://jeffsutherland.org/oopsla2000/

Track: Business Objects

Refactoring the UML – In Search of the Core
Convention Ctr – 212A
Organizers:
Robert France, Colorado State University, france@cs.colostate.edu
Bernhard Rumpe, Munich University of Technology
Jean-Michel Bruel, University of Pau, France
Ana Moreira, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal
Ileana Ober, Telelogic, France
Jonathan Whittle, NASA Ames Research Center, USA

It is evident that a single semantics and concrete syntax for the UML will not suffice. The challenge is to restructure the UML in such a way to facilitate graceful evolution and to provide high-level extension mechanisms that facilitate disciplined development of precise modeling languages. A suggested approach is to base UML language extensions on a core set of UML notations, and to use profiles to manage language extensions. Presentations and discussions will focus on identifying the challenges, recognizing limitations, analyzing proposed approaches to refactoring the UML, and creating and using profiles.

URL: http://www.cs.colostate.edu/OOPSLA2000-workshop25/

Tracks: Analysis and Design; Process and Methodology

Pattern Refactoring
Convention Ctr – 207A
Organizers:
Brian Foote, The Refactory, Inc., foote@refactory.com
James Noble, Victoria University of Wellington
James Coplien, Lucent Technologies
Richard Gabriel, Stanford University
Charles Weir, CWC Limited

The OOPSLA 2000 Workshop on Pattern Refactoring will explore new ways of classifying, organizing, and discussing patterns. It will explore whether existing patterns are combinations of more fundamental ones, and whether progress towards fitting these patterns into a broader pattern language can be made.

URL: http://www.laputan.org/patterns/pattern-refactoring.html

Tracks: Patterns and Frameworks; Software Engineering

Alluring Alchemy: IPO or IOU?
Software Investment Strategies for Delivering Disruptive Solutions
Convention Ctr – 207B
Organizers:
Steven Fraser, Nortel Networks, sdfraser@nortelnetworks.com
Priya Marsonia, Nortel Networks
Bill Opdyke, Lucent Technologies

You are competing in a “dot com” world. Software is the cradle for your innovation. What is your software investment strategy to deliver “breakthrough” products and disruptive technologies? Disruptive technologies fundamentally displace markets and often drive established players out of business. Often, disruptive technologies start out small, serving niche markets, but mature quickly, grabbing market share from the incumbents. In the not too distant past alchemists attempted to turn base metals into gold; now entrepreneurs use software to turn ideas into products. To achieve the best results, what software investments (design methodologies, tools, languages, platforms, etc.) should be made?

URL: Check OOPSLA 2000 website for details.

Track: Project Management

Patterns in Software Architecture: Performance and Availability
Convention Ctr – 209A
Organizers:
Tom O’Rourke, PaineWebber, tom_orourke@acm.org
Peter Long, PriceWaterhouseCoopers

The existence of the World Wide Web has changed the demands on software systems. Many systems today are required to be available all the time with many simultaneous users, and to gracefully handle the failure of both hardware and software components. While the development of WWW-based systems has become commonplace, the design of systems with non-trivial performance and availability requirements is still an art form. In this year’s Patterns in Software Architecture workshop we will examine how performance and availability requirements influence architectural decisions.

URL: http://www.eclipse.net/~tomo/pisa/oopsla2000

Tracks: Architecture; Patterns and Frameworks

Scenario-based Round-Trip Engineering
Convention Ctr – 209B
Organizers:
Tarja Systa, Tampere University of Technology, tsysta@cs.tut.fi
Rudolf Keller, Universite de Montreal
Kai Koskimies, Tampere University of Technology
Bruno Lague, Bell Canada
Brian Selic, Rational Software

Scenario-based approaches are commonly used for behavioral modeling, both in forward and reverse engineering. In UML, scenarios can be described using sequence and collaboration diagrams. Variations of Message Sequence Charts are often used for modeling and analyzing object interactions also in dynamic reverse engineering. Scenarios can be used for analyzing interactions in concurrent and real-time systems and for synthesizing behavioral specifications. This workshop provides a forum for discussing the similarities and differences in scenario-based techniques used in forward and reverse engineering, identifying the limitations and shortcomings of current approaches, and outlining the future research in the domain.

URL: http://www.cs.uta.fi/~cstasy/oopsla2000/workshop.html

Track: Software Engineering

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