Analysis, Design & Architecture

Sunday, 26 October

8:30-17:00 Full day

Tutorial 17 Programmer's Dozen: Thirteen Recommendations for Refactoring, Repairing, and Regaining Control of Your Code
Workshop 9: The 3rd OOPSLA Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling
Workshop 12: Second "Killer Examples" for Design Patterns and ObjectsFirst Workshop
DesignFest®:

8:30-12:00 Morning

Tutorial 3: Domain Analysis for Product-Line Architectures
Tutorial 5: Evolutionary Design
Workshop 17: Extreme Programming Practices in the First CS Courses

13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Tutorial 8: Patterns @ Work
Tutorial 12 Successful Web Services and Service-Oriented Architectures: Beyond the Hype
DesignFest®:

Monday, 27 October

8:30-17:00 Full day

Tutorial 35: Essential Object-Oriented Analysis and Design
Tutorial 36 Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture: Patterns for Concurrent and Networked Objects
Workshop 1: Reuse in Constrained Environments
Workshop 5: The Twelfth OOPSLA Workshop on Behavioral Semantics— Striving for Simplicity
Workshop 13 Beyond Green-Field Software Development: Strategies for Reengineering and Evolution
Workshop 18 Bridging the Gap: Examining Approaches that Connect Business Requirements to Enabling Technology Solutions
Workshop 21: 2nd International Workshop on Language Agnostic Runtimes and Component Based Architectures
Workshop 22: Web Services and Service-Oriented Architecture Best Practices and Patterns

8:30-12:00 Morning

Tutorial 20: The C# Programming Language
Tutorial 23: Beyond the Gang of Four
Tutorial 24: Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture
Tutorial 26: Patterns for High Performance Systems

13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Tutorial 28: Enterprise Integration Patterns
Tutorial 30 Large-Scale Software Architecture: A Practical Guide Using UML
Tutorial 31: Technical Leadership In Practice
Tutorial 32: Domain-Driven Design
Tutorial 33: From Component Reuse to Asset-Based Software Engineering

Tuesday, 28 October

10:30-17:00

DesignFest®:

10:30-12:00

Panel: Meeting the Challenge of Software Engineering Education for Working Professionals in the 21st Century

11:00-11:45

Demonstration 2: Smart Play-Out
Demonstration 7: Making reusable learning objects available through LOM and XML
Demonstration 10 F-Script: Smalltalk Scripting for the Mac OS X Object System
Demonstration 23: AspectJ Development Tools

12:00-12:45

Demonstration 4: Automated Impact Analysis of Objected Oriented Software
Demonstration 6: Hardware/Software Codesign For Neo Smalltalk
Demonstration 8 QuickUML: a tool to support iterative design and code development
Demonstration 9: The Generic Modeling Environment

13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Tutorial 21: Feature Oriented Programming and Product-Lines
Tutorial 37: Dungeons and Patterns!
Tutorial 39: Enterprise Aspect-Oriented Programming with AspectJ
Tutorial 41 C++ Threading: A Generic-Programming Approach
DesignFest®:

15:00-15:45

Demonstration 5 JPie: An Environment for Live Software Construction in Java
Demonstration 11 ATCT: a Java Framework that Offers New Approach to Developing Asynchronous Processes
Demonstration 12: Generative Model Transformer
Demonstration 13: Semantic Software Engineering Tools

15:30-17:00

Panel: Xtreme Programming and Agile Coaching

16:00-16:45

Demonstration 14 MetaEdit+: Defining and using domain-specific modeling languages and code generators
Demonstration 15: A Policy Based System to Incorporate Self-Managing Behaviors in Applications
Demonstration 16: Using Events to Debug Java Programs Backwards in Time
Demonstration 26: Time Conscious Objects

Wednesday, 29 October

10:30-12:00

Panel: Discipline and Practices of TDD (Test Driven Development)

11:00-11:45

Demonstration 17: Redeveloping a High-Performance Computing FrameWork
Demonstration 18: Do You Still Use a Database?
Demonstration 20 Jazz: A Collaborative Application Development Environment
Demonstration 22 T++ : A Tool for Web Application Development with C++

12:00-12:45

Demonstration 2: Smart Play-Out
Demonstration 23: AspectJ Development Tools
Demonstration 24 Variant Management for Embedded Software Product Lines with Pure::Consul and AspectC++
Demonstration 27 Visual SDLC: Improving Requirements Engineering for Object-Oriented Systems

13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Tutorial 45: Test-Driven Development with "fit", the Framework for Integrated Test
Tutorial 47: Enterprise Application Integration with J2EE and .NET
Tutorial 49: Extending Enterprise Systems with Mobile/Wireless Applications
Tutorial 51: Designing Reliable Collaborations

13:30-15:00

Panel: Innovate!

15:00-15:45

Demonstration 3: Visualizing and AspectJ-enabling Eclipse Plugins using Bytecode Instrumentation
Demonstration 4: Automated Impact Analysis of Objected Oriented Software
Demonstration 5 JPie: An Environment for Live Software Construction in Java
Demonstration 21: Requirements Use case Tool (RUT)

16:00-16:45

Demonstration 6: Hardware/Software Codesign For Neo Smalltalk
Demonstration 8 QuickUML: a tool to support iterative design and code development
Demonstration 9: The Generic Modeling Environment
Demonstration 25: Building Compilers For Micro-programmable Graphics Processors

Thursday, 30 October

8:30-12:00 Morning

Tutorial 55 J2EE in Practice: Architectural Variations in the Context of Enterprise Systems
Tutorial 56: Model-Driven Architecture
Tutorial 58: Object-Oriented Modelling with UML

8:30-10:00

Panel: Agile Management—An Oxymoron?

10:30-12:00

Panel Object-Oriented Success Stories: "Learning from our Failures"

11:00-11:45

Demonstration 11 ATCT: a Java Framework that Offers New Approach to Developing Asynchronous Processes
Demonstration 14 MetaEdit+: Defining and using domain-specific modeling languages and code generators
Demonstration 15: A Policy Based System to Incorporate Self-Managing Behaviors in Applications
Demonstration 16: Using Events to Debug Java Programs Backwards in Time

12:00-12:45

Demonstration 3: Visualizing and AspectJ-enabling Eclipse Plugins using Bytecode Instrumentation
Demonstration 7: Making reusable learning objects available through LOM and XML
Demonstration 12: Generative Model Transformer
Demonstration 18: Do You Still Use a Database?

13:00-13:45

Demonstration 21: Requirements Use case Tool (RUT)
Demonstration 24 Variant Management for Embedded Software Product Lines with Pure::Consul and AspectC++
Demonstration 26: Time Conscious Objects
Demonstration 27 Visual SDLC: Improving Requirements Engineering for Object-Oriented Systems

13:30-15:00

Panel: What's so eXtreme About Doing Things Right?
Panel Application Servers: One Size Fits All ... Not?

17 Programmer's Dozen: Thirteen Recommendations for Refactoring, Repairing, and Regaining Control of Your Code

Sunday, 26 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Kevlin Henney, Curbralan Limited, kevlin@curbralan.com

There is no shortage of technical wisdom on how to develop clear and robust code, so why is cryptic code and the corresponding look of puzzlement on a programmer's face such a common sight? Many companies and developers want to use state-of-the-art development practices, but seem swamped and bemused by how much state there really is to that art.

The tutorial offers a concrete, thirteen-point list of recommendations (zero through twelve) that can be applied immediately to reduce code size and complexity, acting as both guidelines for new code and indicators for refactoring. The short list has no ambition to be all that you needed to know about design but were afraid to ask, but it does offer an easily learned and easily practiced set of guidelines that offer the greatest immediate return on investment--the most bang for your buck or oomph for your euro.

Attendee background

This tutorial is targeted at people who write code for a living, typically using a curly-bracket language (C++, C#, Java, etc.) and are looking for that extra edge that allows them to keep their code live and clean.

Format

Lecture

Presenter

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant and trainer. The focus of his work is in programming languages, object orientation, component-based development, UML, patterns, and software architecture. He is a regular columnist for C/C++ Users Journal (online), Application Development Advisor (UK), and JavaSpektrum (Germany), and previously wrote columns in Java Report and C++ Report. He is also a member of the advisory board for Hillside Europe, the program chair for EuroPLoP 2003, and a popular speaker at conferences in the US and Europe.

9 The 3rd OOPSLA Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling

Sunday, 26 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Juha-Pekka Tolvanen, MetaCase Consulting, jpt@metacase.com
Jeff Gray, University of Alabama at Birmingham, gray@cis.uab.edu
Matti Rossi, Helsinki School of Economics, mrossi@hkkk.fi

Today, domain-specific visual languages provide a viable solution to raise the level of abstraction beyond coding. Industrial experience has shown productivity improvements of 5-10 times. We believe that it is time to start talking about Domain-Specific Modeling as the new paradigm for developing applications and product families for a given domain/platform.

In domain-specific modeling the models are constructed using concepts that represent things in the application domain, not concepts of a given programming language. The modeling language follows the domain abstractions and semantics, allowing developers to perceive themselves as working directly with domain concepts. Together with generators and components DSM can automate a large portion of software production.

Workshop topics:

Industry/academic experience reports

  • Approaches to identify constructs for DSMs
  • Novel approaches for code generation from domain-specific models
  • Issues of support/maintenance for systems built with DSMs
  • Evolution of languages in accordance with domain
  • Metamodeling frameworks and languages
  • Tools for supporting DSMs

http://www.cis.uab.edu/info/OOPSLA-DSM03/

12 Second "Killer Examples" for Design Patterns and ObjectsFirst Workshop

Sunday, 26 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Carl Alphonce, University at Buffalo, SUNY, alphonce@cse.buffalo.edu
Dung Nguyen, Rice University, dxnguyen@cs.rice.edu
Philip Ventura, University at Buffalo, SUNY, pventura@cse.buffalo.edu
Michael Wick, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, wickmr@uwec.edu
Stephen Wong, Rice University, swong@cs.rice.edu

According to the Jargon File a "killer app" is an "application that actually makes a sustaining market for a promising but under-utilized technology." A "killer example" provides clear and compelling motivation for a design pattern or design principles. An example is "killer" if it compels someone to spontaneously "buy-in" to that design pattern or technique.

"Killer examples" are important pedagogically because they get students on-board and excited about design in general and design patterns in particular. They are useful to convince peers or employees, not familiar with object-oriented design, that design patterns are central to good object-oriented practices and that they are not an esoteric topic that is best left to expert.

The workshop's goal is to bring together educators and developers who have "killer examples" to share. Pre-workshop activities encourage interaction and refinement of examples prior to the workshop.

http://www.cse.buffalo.edu/~alphonce/KillerExamples

Sunday, 26 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Sunday, 26 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Tuesday, 28 October – 10:30-17:00

Tuesday, 28 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

3 Domain Analysis for Product-Line Architectures

Sunday, 26 October – 8:30-12:00 Morning

Neil Harrison, Avaya Labs Research, nbharrison@avaya.com
Frank Buschmann, Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, Frank.Buschmann@siemens.com

Product-line architectures promise better productivity and less maintenance costs for families of related software systems. A strong product-line architecture is one of the keys to a successful deployment of both product lines and any system destined to go through multiple releases. However, specifying high-quality product-line architectures is a surprisingly difficult task.

Commonality and variability analysis is a powerful domain analysis tool for the specification of product lines. It can help designers produce systems that are robust in the face of change, and that can be easily customized. Additionally, it feeds naturally into OO design. This combination provides a proactive, systematic approach to accomodating changes in software.

This tutorial introduces commonality and variability analysis in a real-world setting. Topics include: underlying principles, methodology, and synthesis with OO design. By the end of the tutorial, you will understand how to use commonality and variability analysis in your OO projects to specify a stable, yet flexible, software architecture.

Attendee background

This tutorial is aimed at architects and designers of systems that have many variations, such as product families and systems with multiple releases.

Prerequisites: Attendees should have solid background in OO principles, and some OO design experience. Experience in specification or analysis is helpful but not required.

Format

Lecture with exercises

Presenters

Neil Harrison is a researcher at Avaya Labs, where he consults with software projects in architecture, process, organizations, estimation, and product line engineering. He has been involved in software patterns since 1994. He has organized pattern conferences and has taught many courses on patterns. He is a member of the Hillside Group board of directors. He has published patterns and chapters in pattern books, and was lead editor of Pattern Languages of Program Design, Volume 4.

Frank Buschmann is senior principal engineer at Siemens Corporate Technology in Munich, Germany. His interests include Object Technology, Software Architecture, and Patterns. Frank has been involved in many software development projects. He is leading Siemens' software architecture research activities. Frank is co-author of "Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture -- A System of Patterns" and "Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture -- Patterns for Concurrent and Networked Objects".

5 Evolutionary Design

Sunday, 26 October – 8:30-12:00 Morning

Joshua Kerievsky, Extreme Programmer and Coach, Industrial Logic, Inc., joshua@industriallogic.com
Russ Rufer, Extreme Programmer and Coach, Industrial Logic, Inc., russ@industriallogic.com

While Test-Driven Development and Refactoring are extremely useful software development practices, they are insufficient for evolving great designs. What's missing are the thinking and coding practices that real-world evolutionary designers use to evolve top-notch designs effectively. Such practices include critical learning that results from early end-to-end system development, significant time savings obtained by determining what doesn't need to be automated, eye-opening design simplicity achieved by automating failing acceptance tests before writing code, important design progress that results, paradoxically, from undoing previous design work and more.

This tutorial takes the mystery out of Evolutionary Design by naming and explaining what its thinking and coding practices are and how to implement them. You'll be challenged to solve Evolutionary Design exercises and you'll experience how a game of blackjack evolves from a first failing UI test to a functioning version of the game. Along the way you'll learn how not to evolve blackjack, you'll study micro-snapshots of the evolution-in-progress and you'll understand what the evolution of a game teaches us about Evolutionary Design on real-world projects.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Participants should be able to read Java™ code to get the most out of the session. No background is required in Agile Development, Refactoring, or Test-Driven Design.

Format

Interactive lecture and programming demonstration

Presenters

Joshua Kerievsky has been programming professionally since 1987, and is the founder of Industrial Logic (http://industriallogic.com), a company specializing in Extreme Programming (XP). Since 1999, Joshua has been coaching and programming on small, large and distributed XP projects and teaching XP to people throughout the world. He is the author of numerous XP and patterns-based articles, simulations and games, including the forthcoming book, Refactoring to Patterns (http://industriallogic.com/xp/refactoring/).

Russ Rufer has been building software systems for 15 years. His wide-ranging experience includes desktop applications, embedded firmware, telecommunications, networking, satellite simulation, and productivity tools. Russ leads weekly meetings of the Silicon Valley Patterns Group, which he founded in 1998 (http://pentad.com/SiliconValleyPatterns.html) and regularly organizes pre-publication review teams to provide feedback on new literature from the software patterns and agile development communities. Russ has worked with Industrial Logic for several years. He divides his time between pure development, coaching and leading workshops on Extreme Programming, Testing, Refactoring and Patterns.

17 Extreme Programming Practices in the First CS Courses

Sunday, 26 October – 8:30-12:00 Morning

Joseph Bergin, Pace University, berginf@pace.edu
James Caristi, Valparaiso University, James.Caristi@valpo.edu
Daniel Steinberg, Dim Sum Thinking, Inc., DSteinberg@core.com

Most of the practices of Extreme Programming are beneficial to students in their computer science courses. But in order to teach students properly, pedagogical changes are needed as early as CS1. This workshop seeks participants who have significant ideas for changes that can be made in early computer science courses that involve integrating any of the practices of Extreme Programming or other agile methodologies.

Would-be participants should send in a short position paper outlining one or two ideas they have. During the workshop, participants will critically discuss the ideas that have been suggested and explore any new ones that arise. Participants will agree to allow their ideas to be shared via a web page to be posted in various CS educational resources repositories.

http://csis.pace.edu/~bergin/XPWorkshop

8 Patterns @ Work

Sunday, 26 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Frank Buschmann, Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, Frank.Buschmann@siemens.com

This tutorial illustrates the application of design patterns by example. We present in detail a real-world system and describe how it is designed with patterns, with a focus on distribution and concurrency, flexibility, and components. In particular, we will re-play the process of the system's construction step by step, discuss the design problems that occur, present one or more patterns that can help to address these problems, discuss which of the alternative patterns we selected and why, and show how we actually applied the selected patterns. This sequence illustrates how the design of the system slowly evolves towards the final architecture. We will also see that using patterns in practice is influenced by many factors: concrete constraints and requirements set by the application under development, limited or overstated understanding of particular patterns, varying developer skills, and also personal preferences. A major lesson that we can learn from this discussion is that there exists no "right pattern" for addressing a particular design problem, but rather, different patterns apply in different situations.

A reflection on the case study leads us to general guidelines and golden rules for applying patterns in practise, and we discuss how these guidelines and rules aid in building high-quality software with predictable properties. The tutorial concludes with a summary of our experiences from several projects in which we applied patterns: what worked, what could be improved, and what we learned.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Attendees are expected to have sound knowledge of object technology, and basic knowledge of both UML notation and the pattern concept.

Format

Interactive lecture

Presenter

Frank Buschmann is senior principal engineer at Siemens Corporate Technology in Munich, Germany. His interests include Object Technology, Frameworks and Patterns. Frank has been involved in many software development projects. He is leading Siemens' pattern research activities. Frank is co-author of "Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture -- A System of Patterns" and "Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture -- Patterns for Concurrent and Networked Objects".

12 Successful Web Services and Service-Oriented Architectures: Beyond the Hype

Sunday, 26 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Ali Arsanjani, IBM Corporation and Maharishi University of Management, arsanjan@us.ibm.com
Bruce Anderson, IBM Corporation, bruce_anderson@uk.ibm.com

This intense and unique tutorial provides an introduction and step-by-step walkthrough of the state of the art of Web services (WS) and Service-oriented Architectures (SOA).

The tutorial presents overviews of key web services standards (including WS-I, WSIF, WSIL, SOAP, WSDL, UDDI) considerations for their use, and some tools and technologies (including Apache Axis and related projects) that can be employed to implement them. Next, it presents an architectural blueprint for web services architecture that can server as a basis for most projects. With these standards, considerations, tools and blueprint in hand, we present a set of concrete process steps that lead to the realization of an SOA.

The tutorial will then present a set of patterns for the design and implementation of web services based architectures including Business Service, Service Gateway, SOAP Document, and SOAP Method. We also discuss methods for assessment that can be used as checklists by architects who wish to evaluate web services architectures.

Finally, to tie these togather, we will present two case studies, from the financial services and retail purchasing domains.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of object-oriented development, and some knowledge of software architecture, design and implementation, are required.

Format

Lecture and hands-on exercises

Presenters

Ali Arsanjani has over 19 years of industrial experience. He is a Senior Consulting I/T Architect for IBM's National E-business Application Development Center of Competency, where he leads the Component-based Development and Integration Competency area. He has been architecting n-tier e-business systems based on object, component, and service-oriented technologies for IBM's larger clients. His areas of experience and research include component-based development, service-oriented architectures, business rules modeling and implementation, creation and evolution of reusable assets, extending methods for CBD, building business frameworks and components and incorporating patterns and pattern languages to build resilient and stable software architectures. He has been actively speaking and publishing in these areas for a variety of industrial and academic audiences.

Bruce Anderson is a Senior Consultant in IBM's Component Technology Services. He specialises in working with customer organisations to create powerful component- and object-based solutions, and in helping individuals to develop their knowledge and understanding. Typically, Mr. Anderson leads planning and definition work, and mentoring programme leaders, project managers or architects into their roles.

35 Essential Object-Oriented Analysis and Design

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Jill Aden, EDS, jill.aden@eds.com
Joseph Brennan, EDS, joseph.brennan@eds.com

This tutorial is a short, quick-paced introduction to object-oriented analysis and design, based on practical project experience. It will provide you with the knowledge and skills to:

  • Create use case documents
  • Understand object-oriented concepts, terminology and buzzwords
  • Identify classes and create class diagrams
  • Understand and use the Unified Modeling Language (UML), identify behaviors and create sequence diagrams, and recognize other UML diagrams
  • Gain an understanding of what patterns are and review 5 of the "gang of four" design patterns

Attendee background

This tutorial is targeted to people who are new to objects and object-oriented concepts. It is intended for people who have had some exposure to objects but need more knowledge to be able to put all the pieces together.

Format

Lecture

Presenters

Jill Aden has worked for 18 years with EDS as a Systems Architect and has worked with objects since 1993. She is a member of the OTUG group at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, MN and served as the Communications Chair at OOPSLA 2002. Ms. Aden is in the process of writing an object-oriented analysis and design book for undergraduate students. At EDS, she mentors, consults, and teaches object-oriented concepts internally and externally to clients.

Joseph Brennan is a System Architect with EDS, where he has worked for 18 years. He is a member of the Twin Cities Java User Group and has been working with objects for 10 years. Mr. Brennan is in the process of writing an object-oriented analysis and design book for undergraduate students. At EDS, Joseph mentors, consults, and teaches object-oriented development and concepts within EDS and externally to clients. Joseph is a Sun Certified Java Instructor and Java Developer.

36 Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture: Patterns for Concurrent and Networked Objects

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Douglas Schmidt, Vanderbilt University, d.schmidt@darpa.mil

Developing concurrent and networked object-oriented applications is hard; developing high-quality reusable components for these types of applications is even harder. The principles, methods, and skills required to develop reusable software cannot be learned by generalities. This tutorial, therefore, illustrates by example how to significantly simplify and enhance the development of communication software that effectively utilizes concurrency and distribution via the use of:

  • Object-oriented design techniques, such as patterns, layered modularity, and data/control abstraction
  • Object-oriented language features, such as abstract classes, inheritance, dynamic binding, and parameterized types
  • Middleware, such as object-oriented frameworks for host infrastructure middleware (e.g., ACE) and component middleware (like J2EE, the CORBA Component Model, and .NET)
  • Advanced operating system mechanisms, such as event demultiplexing, multi-threading, multi-processing, and explicit dynamic linking

The tutorial examines patterns and framework solutions abstracted from production systems in domains including from telecommunications, avionics, online trading systems, medical systems, web servers, and real-time object request brokers to illustrate the key technical design and implementation issues. The material presented in this tutorial is based on the book "Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture: Patterns for Concurrent and Networked Objects," Wiley & Sons, 2000.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Participants must be familiar with object-oriented development techniques (such as patterns, modularity, and information hiding), OO language features (such as classes, inheritance, dynamic binding, and parameterized types), systems programming concepts (such as process/thread management, synchronization, and IPC), and networking terminology (such as client/server architectures and TCP/IP).

Format

Lecture

Presenter

Dr. Douglas C. Schmidt is a Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department at Vanderbilt University. His research focuses on patterns, optimization techniques, and empirical analyses of object-oriented frameworks that facilitate the development of distributed real-time and embedded (DRE) middleware. Dr. Schmidt has over fifteen years of experience developing DRE middleware as the chief architect and developer of ACE and TAO, which are widely used, open-source middleware containing a rich set of components that implement patterns for DRE systems. Dr. Schmidt has also served as a Deputy Director and a Program Manager at DARPA, where he led the national R&D effort on DRE middleware.

1 Reuse in Constrained Environments

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Markus Voelter, independent consultant, voelter@acm.org
Michael Kircher, Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, michael.kircher@siemens.com
Christa Schwanninger, Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, christa.schwanninger@siemens.com
Uwe Zdun, New Media Lab, Vienna University of Economics and BA, zdun@acm.org
Alexander Schmid, Personal, alexander.schmid@alegu.de

The main goals of software reuse are to increase quality, reduce cost, and shorten development cycles. The interesting question in this context is: How to achieve reuse in constrained environments? In desktop and enterprise systems, object-orientation, components, frameworks, service-oriented architectures and, most recently, model-driven development are proposed as cornerstones for efficient reuse. In constrained environments (i.e. embedded and real time systems, PDAs, smart phones, settop boxes) reuse is not as simple, because most reuse techniques imply some kind of overhead: memory, performance, or determinism.

This workshop explores practical reuse techniques for constrained environments. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • middleware technologies
  • quality of service provisions
  • code composition and weaving
  • code generation, composition and weaving
  • small and efficient frameworks
  • component infrastructures for embedded systems
  • model driven development
  • static variability and metaprogramming
  • component composition
  • design and architectural patterns

http://www.voelter.de/conferences/oopsla03.html

5 The Twelfth OOPSLA Workshop on Behavioral Semantics— Striving for Simplicity

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Haim Kilov, Independent Consultant and Stevens Institute of Technology, haimk@acm.org
Kenneth Baclawski, Northeastern University, ken@baclawski.com

The goal of this workshop is to foster precise, explicit, and elegant OO specifications of business and system semantics, independently of any (possible) realization. Substantial progress has been made in these areas, both in academia and in industry. However, in too many cases only lip service to semantic issues has been provided, and as a result the systems we build or buy are all too often excessively complex or (this is not an exclusive or) are not what they are supposed to be. Doing better than that requires both a clear understanding of the problem semantics within the context of their business and technological environments, and an abstract, precise and explicit specification of that semantics.

The specific theme this year is on striving for simplicity. In order to simplify IT systems, we need to use abstraction — in C.A.R.Hoare's words, "only abstraction enables a manager or a chief programmer to exert real technical control". The same considerations apply to understanding, modeling and making (strategic, tactical and operational) decisions about businesses.

http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/kenb/oopsla2003

13 Beyond Green-Field Software Development: Strategies for Reengineering and Evolution

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Dennis Mancl, Lucent Technologies - Bell Labs, mancl@lucent.com
William Opdyke, North Central College, opdyke@acm.org
Steven Fraser, Consultant, sdfraser@acm.org
Willem-Jan van den Heuvel, Infolab Tilburg University, W.J.A.M.vdnHeuvel@uvt.nl

Reengineering and evolution are important for long-lived software systems. Change and growth in the system's requirements and functionality occur in all kinds of systems — and it is especially critical to manage the evolution process in modern agile and extreme software processes. The management of change and growth may in fact become a daily activity, so a well defined set of techniques and tools for doing reengineering are critical to success.

This workshop picks up from the results of the OOPSLA '02 workshop "Tackling the Discovery Costs of Evolving Software Systems."

Participants will present and discuss encapsulation and reverse engineering techniques, impact of reengineering on software processes, organizational concerns, and experiences in managing software change "in the extreme".

http://csc.noctrl.edu/f/opdyke/OOPSLA2003

18 Bridging the Gap: Examining Approaches that Connect Business Requirements to Enabling Technology Solutions

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Ralph Hodgson, TopQuadrant, Inc., ralph@topquadrant.com
Dave Parrish, Management Science Associates, Inc., dparrish@msa.com
Christine Brautigam, Direct Dynamics, Inc., christine@directdynamics.biz
Dr. Robert F. Coyne, TopQuadrant, Inc., robert@topquadrant.com

To ensure return on technology investments, companies need to align IT projects to their Business Strategy. Today a technology solution has many stakeholders, requiring systems to be developed in a multi-stakeholder context.

The key stakeholders include:

  • End-users of the solution who will have to live with the solution and will ultimately decide how successful it is – often they are external customers of the company
  • The Enterprise that is hoping to realize a business ROI from the solution
  • IT departments or other technical organizations responsible for implementing the solution
  • Technology vendors whose technology provides underpinnings and components of the solution

Stakeholders often have conflicting objectives. Moreover, differing sub-cultures and ways of working and communicating contribute to communication barriers and the possibility of project failure.

This workshop explores ways of realizing an effective “bridge” to close communication gaps and to create a shared vision and plan for realization among different stakeholders. The benefits of having an effective way to translate a Business Strategy into optimal technology solutions include:

  • Improved likelihood of project success
  • Increased enterprise vitality through effective use of technology
  • Greater ROI of technology spending

The workshop will look into approaches for accelerated solution design that can reliably translate and connect core business requirements into the best choices for enabling technology and software implementations. In particular, the workshop will solicit submissions that summarize substantive candidates of such approaches for presentation and subsequent cross-comparison and analysis. Workshop attendees will discuss, analyze and attempt to distill the essence of what makes these approaches work – looking for a core set of similar features, activities, constructs and results produced that have proven to be effective and reliable.

One possible example of such a common feature -- the use of solution stories -- appears to foster a common understanding of ideas and confidence in proposed capabilities for given domains. As one of the probable items of focus, the workshop will seek to confirm that this is a common feature, and to understand why. The overall goal and result of the workshop will be to catalog the most important, common features or activities of the best approaches and how and why each works, whether by itself or in combination with the rest.

http://www.topquadrant.com/workshops/oopsla2003.htm

21 2nd International Workshop on Language Agnostic Runtimes and Component Based Architectures

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Yahya Mirza, Aurora Borealis Software, yahya_mirza@hotmail.com
David Simmons, Smallscript LLC, David.Simmons@smallscript.com
Mario Wolczko, Sun Microsystems, mario@eng.sun.com
Shawn Woods, Microsoft, shawnwoo@microsoft.com

The objective of this workshop is to have a detailed technical discussion on requirements for future virtual machines and advanced languages from an applications perspective.

Issues such as what features and their virtual machine implementations actually promote object reuse. What has worked in the past? Has the original design goals of the respective participants in their respective object architectures been met. What problems were encountered during the commercial deployment of their respective architectures? What do the participants see as the direction they believe that virtual machine technology will take in the near future, as well as over the long haul?

http://www.aurorasoft.net/workshops/lar03/lar03home.htm

22 Web Services and Service-Oriented Architecture Best Practices and Patterns

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-17:00 Full day

Ali Arsanjani, IBM Corporation, arsanjan@us.ibm.com
Kerrie Holley, IBM, holley@us.ibm.com

Web services and service-oriented architectures are promising technology. However, they are still fraught with problems and issues: operational issues, quality of service, functional and methodology related.

In this workshop we aim to identify real industry experiences (successes or failures) in designing and implementing web services based systems. And we look for research papers aiming at identifying and alleviating major bottlenecks and issues related to service-oriented architectures, web services and dynamically re-configurable architectures.

This workshop builds on the Object Oriented Web Services workshops in previous OOPSLA conferences and sets a slightly different direction, aimed at consolidating web services and service-oriented architecture best practices and patterns.

http://www.arsanjani.com/oopsla2003/webservices.htm

20 The C# Programming Language

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-12:00 Morning

Anders Hejlsberg, Microsoft Corporation, andersh@microsoft.com

This tutorial gives an in-depth overview of the C# programming language, both as it currently exists and as it is planned to evolve in the near future. An emphasis will be placed on explaining design rationales, making the talk interesting for both programmers and language designers.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Participants should have a good working knowledge of object-oriented programming. Previous experience with C# and .NET is not required.

Format

Lecture and working code demonstrations

Presenter

Anders Hejlsberg is a Distinguished Engineer in the Developer Division at Microsoft Corporation. He is the chief designer of the C# programming language and a key participant in the development of the .NET Framework. Before joining Microsoft in 1996, Anders was a Principal Engineer at Borland International. As one of the first employees of Borland, he was the original author of Turbo Pascal and later worked as the Chief Architect of the Delphi product line. Anders studied Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark.

23 Beyond the Gang of Four

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-12:00 Morning

Frank Buschmann, Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, Frank.Buschmann@siemens.com
Kevlin Henney, Curbralan Ltd., kevlin@curbralan.com

When software developers mention design patterns, the chances are that they are talking about Design Patterns, the classic book by the Gang of Four, rather than design patterns in general. Even when they are talking about the pattern concept, as opposed to specific patterns, they often think in terms of the form and idea presented in GoF, and rarely beyond.

Since the publication of the seminal work by the GoF in 1994, however, a great deal of research and practice in patterns has led to a better understanding of both the pattern concept and the strengths and weaknesses of the GoF patterns themselves.

This tutorial revisits the GoF patterns, reflects on them, deconstructs them, and re-evaluates them from the practitioner's perspective: why patterns such as Abstract Factory, Builder, Flyweight, Command, and others are missing a vital ingredient to be proper parts of an architectural vocabulary; why Iterator is not always the best solution for traversing aggregates; why State is not the only state pattern; why some patterns, such as Bridge, are more than one pattern; and what you can do about it.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Sound knowledge of the pattern concept and the GoF patterns are required.

Format

Interactive lecture

Presenters

Frank Buschmann is senior principal engineer at Siemens Corporate Technology in Munich, Germany. His interests include Object Technology, Frameworks and Patterns. Frank has been involved in many software development projects. He is leading Siemens' pattern research activities. Frank is co-author of "Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture -- A System of Patterns" and "Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture -- Patterns for Concurrent and Networked Objects".

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant and trainer. The focus of his work is in programming languages, OO, CBD, UML, patterns, and software architecture. He is a regular columnist for C/C++ Users Journal (online), Application Development Advisor (UK), and JavaSpektrum (Germany), and previously wrote columns in Java Report and C++ Report. He is also a member of the advisory board for Hillside Europe, the program chair for EuroPLoP 2003, and a popular speaker at conferences in the US and Europe.

24 Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-12:00 Morning

Martin Fowler, ThoughtWorks, fowler@acm.org

The last decade or so has been one of technology churn. We've seen client/server, CORBA, J2EE, COM, .NET and a host of other enterprise platforms appear or fade from view, or both. Keeping up with resulting alphabet soup is a full time job, even without applications to ship.

But amongst all of this churn, some techniques stay relatively constant. So we've been trying to identify these common patterns and taking note of how we use the ideas from one technology and use similar, but not the same designs in others.

In this tutorial, we'll explore a number of these patterns. We will touch on various topics, including layering, business logic organization, database mapping, organizing a web interface and the allure of distributed objects.

The tutorial is based on the author's book, "Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture."

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Participants must be familiar with the basics of object-oriented development in an enterprise setting.

Format

Lecture

Presenter

Martin Fowler is the Chief Scientist of ThoughtWorks, a systems delivery and consulting firm. He has pioneered the use of object-oriented technology in enterprise applications and has written five books on software development.

26 Patterns for High Performance Systems

Monday, 27 October – 8:30-12:00 Morning

Robert Hanmer, Lucent Technologies, hanmer@lucent.com

Good performance, reliability, and maintainability are designed into software. The tutorial presents a guided tour through existing, industry-tested patterns that aid in the design of high performance, real-time, distributed and embedded systems, using a telecommunications system to structure the tour. The tour highlights various collections of patterns, as well as their sources -- books, conference notes and websites. Our objective is to make participants aware of these valuable resources that can greatly simplify their design work. By reusing a proven solution to frequently occurring problems, their efforts can be focused on the truly new portions of their design.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Attendees should have a basic understanding of what a pattern is. No prior knowledge in any specific domain is expected. Attendees will gain the most from the tutorial if they have considered the general performance and reliability constraints with which they most frequently work.

Format

Lecture

Presenter

Robert Hanmer is a Consulting Member of Technical Staff in the Convergence Solutions R&D organization of Lucent Technologies. He began working with patterns in 1995, capturing the patterns of a large telephone switching system and also of telecommunications systems in general. He has served as Program Chair at several PLoP conferences. He is active in the Hillside Group, as well as the TelePLoP group, which is an informal collection of pattern advocates and authors interested in the field of telecommunications. He has authored many patterns that discuss key solutions for high performance systems.

28 Enterprise Integration Patterns

Monday, 27 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Bobby Woolf, Independent Consultant, woolf@acm.org
Gregor Hohpe, ThoughtWorks, Inc., gregor@hohpe.com

It's no longer enough to be able to develop fantastic applications; now they have to be able to coordinate with each other as well. Whether your sales application must interface with your inventory application, your procurement application must integrate with an auction site, or your PDAs PIM must synchronize with the corporate calendar server, just about any application can be made better by integrating it with other applications. Customers expect an integrated, single-application experience, regardless of how internal functionality may be split across applications, so applications must be integrated.

This tutorial will teach you how to use messaging to integrate applications effectively by presenting a set of patterns--best practices that have been proven over time in a variety of integration projects. These patterns will teach you how to use message-based communication successfully.

This tutorial is based on technology-agnostic patterns and applies to a variety of messaging technologies, ranging from the Java Message Service (JMS) API in J2EE, and the System.Messaging namespace in Microsoft .NET, to enterprise application integration (EAI) and middleware products from vendors such as IBM, TIBCO, WebMethods, SeeBeyond, Vitria and others.

Attendee background

This tutorial is intended for enterprise application architects, designers, and developers who have basic familiarity with messaging tools and technologies, but wish to learn how best to use messaging to achieve enterprise application integration, and wish to be able to better communicate about these issues.

Prerequisites: Basic familiarity with messaging tools and technologies.

Format

Lecture

Presenters

Bobby Woolf has been developing multi-tier object-oriented business applications for thirteen years using Java/J2EE, Smalltalk, and embedded systems for messaging, workflow, business rules, and persistence. One of his specialties is developing architectures that integrate workflow, EJB, and JMS. He has presented tutorials at OOPSLA and JavaEdge, published articles in Java Developer's Journal and on the DeveloperWorks web site, published patterns in all of the PLoPD books, and is a co-author of The Design Patterns Smalltalk Companion. He is also a co-author of the upcoming book "Enterprise Integration Patterns" from Addison-Wesley.

Gregor Hohpe leads the Enterprise Integration Services competency at ThoughtWorks, Inc., a provider of application development and integration services. Over the past years, he has been helping clients around the globe design and implement enterprise integration solutions. His current work focuses on the application of agile methods and design patterns to the development of integration solutions. Gregor is a frequent speaker at technical conferences and has published a number of articles presenting a no-hype view on enterprise integration, Web services and Service-Oriented Architectures. He is a co-author of the upcoming book "Enterprise Integration Patterns."

30 Large-Scale Software Architecture: A Practical Guide Using UML

Monday, 27 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Jeff Garland, CrystalClear Software, jeff@crystalclearsoftware.com
Richard Anthony, General Dynamics Decision Systems, Richard.Anthony@gd-decisionsystems.com

Dealing with the complexity of large-scale systems can be a challenge for even the most experienced software designers and developers. Large software systems can contain millions of elements, which interact to achieve the system functionality. Managing and representing the complexity involved in the interaction of these elements is a difficult task.

This tutorial will help you manage this complexity through the use of industry-proven software architecture approaches, based on the UML and IEEE 1471 standards. We will introduce software architecture terminology and approaches, focusing on a set of UML viewpoints that represent the important aspects of a large-scale software architecture. These viewpoints include context, component, subsystems, process and deployment. These viewpoints leverage the recent IEEE 1471 standard for software architecture representations providing a description of the purpose, stakeholders, and techniques associated with each viewpoint.

The tutorial also presents other practical techniques essential to developing an effective software architecture. Topics covered in the tutorial include:

  • Techniques for handling large, complex systems
  • Modeling of software subsystem interfaces and dependencies
  • Modeling of components, component interactions, and component integration
  • Modeling of process communication and software/hardware deployment
  • Fitting architecture development into development processes

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Attendees must have a basic understanding of UML, have experience as a software developer, and an interest in software architecture. Experience on a large-scale software system is beneficial but not required.

Format

Lecture and discussion

Presenters

Jeff Garland has worked on many large-scale software projects over the past 16 years, and in many different domains, including telephone switching, industrial process control, satellite ground control, and financial systems. He has served as both the lead architect and a member of the architecture team on several of these projects. Mr. Garland holds a Master's degree in Computer Science from Arizona State University and a Bachelor of Science in Systems Engineering from the University of Arizona. He is currently President and Chief Technology Officer of CrystalClear Software. CrystalClear Software is a consulting firm that specializes in the development of software architectures for large-scale systems.

Richard Anthony has l7 years experience working on large-scale software development efforts. The systems are from application areas such as satellite and network operations systems, telephony base station control, manufacturing, and simulation. He has served in the role of chief software architect, design engineering technical lead, software design lead, software system engineer, and developer on projects in these application areas. Mr. Anthony holds Master's degrees in Computer Science and Mathematics, as well as a Bachelor's degree in Mathematics Education, all from the University of Wyoming. He is currently a Senior Software Architect at General Dynamics Decision Systems.

31 Technical Leadership In Practice

Monday, 27 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Andrew Schneider, BJSS (www.bjss.co.uk), as@bjss.co.uk

So you're a technical lead. You will have to combine many disparate skills to achieve that elusive goal, the successful team. Project management, people management, requirements management, as well as good design and implementation skills, are all core ingredients. This tutorial examines techniques and patterns for being a successful technical lead. Key areas covered include:

  • Becoming a technical lead (leadership styles, winning respect etc).
  • Project initiation--laying down the foundations, selecting a method.
  • Getting decisions adopted and socialised.
  • Targeted design and architecture.
  • Transparent design.
  • Managing upwards--metrics, monitoring progress, etc.
  • Handling personnel problems.
  • Handling a project in crisis.
  • Worry Patterns--signs not to be ignored.

...and more. A recent project will be used to illustrate the application of the techniques "in the wild." During the tutorial, there will be time to share experiences, discuss problems and consider other solutions. Participants will leave with a comprehensive set of references.

Attendee background

Participants will be either new to technical leadership or already have been in a technical lead role for some time and wish to share experiences and learn some new techniques.

Format

Lecture, group discussion, and copious real world examples

Presenter

Andy Schneider wears consultant and architect hats for BJSS, a software services organisation. He has been involved in implementing, designing and leading projects utilising object-oriented technology since 1990. His primary interests are complex distributed systems, security and technical management. When wearing his consultant hat, he finds himself performing presentations and tutorials on a regular basis.

32 Domain-Driven Design

Monday, 27 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Eric Evans, Domain Language, Inc., eric@domainlanguage.com
Ralph Johnson, University of Illinois, johnson@cs.uiuc.edu

Large information systems need a domain model. Development teams know this, yet they often end up with little more than data schemas. This tutorial delves into how a team, developers and domain experts together, can engage in progressively deeper exploration of their problem domain while making that understanding tangible as a practical software design. This model is not just a diagram or an analysis artifact. It provides the very foundation of the design, the driving force of analysis, even the basis of the language spoken on the project.

The tutorial will focus on three topics:

  1. The conscious use of language on the project to refine and communicate models and strengthen the connection with the implementation.
  2. A subtly different style of refactoring aimed at deepening model insight, in addition to making technical improvements to the code.
  3. A brief look at strategic design, which is crucial to larger projects. These are the decisions where design and politics often intersect.

The tutorial will include group reading and discussion of selected patterns from the book "Domain-Driven Design," Addison-Wesley 2003, and reenactments of domain modeling scenarios.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Attendees must have a basic understanding of object-oriented modeling and the ability to read UML. Some involvement, past or present, in a complex software development project is helpful in seeing the applicability of the material, but is not essential. Familiarity with the practices of Agile Methods and/or Extreme Programming is helpful, but not essential.

Format

Interactive reading/discussion session, and simulations of the activities and processes that go into making domain design decisions.

Presenters

Eric Evans is a specialist in domain modeling and design in large business systems. Since the early 1990s, he has worked on many projects developing large business systems with objects and, since 1999, has been deeply involved in three projects committed to the Extreme Programming process (XP), and has trained teams in the Extreme Programming process. Out of this range of experiences have emerged the synthesis of principles and techniques shared in the book "Domain-Driven Design," Addison-Wesley 2003.

Ralph Johnson is a co-author of the now-legendary book, "Design Patterns" (Addison-Wesley, 1995). He is on the faculty of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois. He is the leader of the UIUC patterns/Software Architecture Group and the coordinator of the senior projects program for the department. His professional interests cover nearly all things object-oriented, especially frameworks, patterns, business objects, Smalltalk, COM and refactoring.

33 From Component Reuse to Asset-Based Software Engineering

Monday, 27 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Martin Griss, Martin Griss Associates, martin@griss.com

This tutorial presents an introduction to the interlocking business, organizational and technical issues that influence large-scale software reuse and asset-based software engineering. Asset reuse is one of the most significant enablers for productivity improvements; it appears simple at first glance, yet is difficult to execute. Most organizations do not know how to effectively structure a reuse program to match their business and software goals. We describe three primary flavors of reuse: Facilitated, Managed and Designed. An organization selects and practices one or more of these flavors of reuse by varying the amount of proactive management of assets and process; proactive design and architecture of assets to enhance reuse, and amount of top-down, pre-work, versus bottom up incremental reengineering. Particularly important is how it encourages or enforces use of these assets, how it invests in the people, process and technology to support the reuse program, and how it structures and manages the organization to provide, support and utilize the assets. Topics covered include: Business and economic issues; reuse experience; flavors of reuse; architecture, components, frameworks and product lines; reuse process and design methods, domain engineering; reuse governance and organization; and technology and tools such as templates, aspects, generators and repositories.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: This tutorial is geared towards managers, architects and senior developers who have some software engineering, programming and modeling experience, and who are eager to establish or refine an asset reuse program.

Format

Lecture and interactive discussion

Presenter

Martin Griss is one of the world's leading authorities on software reuse. He spent nearly two decades as Principal Laboratory Scientist and Laboratory Director at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories. Known as HP's "Reuse Rabbi," he created and led a corporate-wide software reuse program. His research has covered software reuse processes and tools, software engineering tools and methods, and software agents. He is co-author of "Software Reuse: Architecture, Process and Organization for Business Success," and author of over 60 book chapters, papers, columns and reports. He is an Adjunct Professor of Computer Science at the University of California at Santa Cruz, a consultant, and member of Flashline's Software Development Productivity Council.

Meeting the Challenge of Software Engineering Education for Working Professionals in the 21st Century

Tuesday, 28 October – 10:30-12:00

Steven Fraser (Chair), Independent Consultant, sdfraser@acm.org
Ray Bareiss, CMU (West), bareiss@cs.cmu.edu
Barry Boehm, USC, boehm@cse.usc.edu
Mark Hayes, Microsoft, mahayes@microsoft.com
Laura Hill, Sun Microsystems, laura.hill@sun.com
Gabby Silberman, IBM, gabbys@us.ibm.com
Dave Thomas, Bedarra Research Labs, dave@bedarra.com

Software engineering education for working professionals remains a challenge from the perspective of determining relevant content; identifying effective methods for delivery; and maintaining the focus and motivation of students. This panel brings together academic and industry professionals to share their perspectives and experiences. Anticipated points for discussion include: education/training delivery strategies, curriculum definition, marketing issues, collaboration strategies to engage industry sponsorship, value assessments for students and sponsoring organizations, and program success stories. This will be a highly interactive panel and the audience should come prepared to both ask and answer questions.

2 Smart Play-Out

Tuesday, 28 October – 11:00-11:45

Wednesday, 29 October – 12:00-12:45

David Harel, Weizmann Institute of Science, dharel@wisdom.weizmann.ac.il
Hillel Kugler, Weizmann Institute of Science, kugler@wisdom.weizmann.ac.il
Rami Marelly, Weizmann Institute of Science, rami@wisdom.weizmann.ac.il
Amir Pnueli, Weizmann Institute of Science, amir@wisdom.weizmann.ac.il

This demo shows Smart Play-Out, a new method for executing and analyzing scenario based behavior, which is part of the Play-In/Play-Out methodology and the Play-Engine tool. Behavior is "played in" directly from the system's GUI, and as this is being done the play-engine continuously constructs Live Sequence Charts (LSCs), a powerful extension of sequence diagrams. Later behavior can be "played out" freely from the GUI, and the tool executes the LSCs directly, thus driving the system's behavior.

Smart Play-Out, a recent strengthening of the play-out mechanism, uses verification methods, mainly model-checking, to execute and analyze the LSCs, helping the execution to avoid deadlocks and violations. Thus, Smart Play-Out utilizes verification techniques to run programs, rather than to verify them.

Our approach is especially useful for specifying reactive object-oriented systems, and the LSC language we use has been extended to distinguish between objects and classes and to allow specifying of symbolic scenarios that hold for all object instances of a certain class.

In the demo we will show and explain the tool, illustrating the approach on several applications we have studied, including a phone network, a machine for manufacturing smart-cards and a model of a biological system.

As a long-term goal, for certain kinds of systems the play-out methodology, enhanced by formal verification techniques, could serve as the final implementation too, with the play-out being all that is needed for running the system itself.

7 Making reusable learning objects available through LOM and XML

Tuesday, 28 October – 11:00-11:45

Thursday, 30 October – 12:00-12:45

Lars Arne Skar, Implementation lead/System architect, lars@bekk.no
Thomas Heiberg, Portal developer/system integrator, thomas.heiberg@bekk.no
Vidar Kongsli, Content developer/integrator, vidar.kongsli@bekk.no

The norwegian ministry of education and research is currently establishing an education portal as part of the national learning net for the education sector. One major goal of this initiative is to enable better reuse and sharing of learning objects on the internet. The portal is developed by BEKK, a Norwegian consultancy.

The demonstration will show:

  • An efficient and user friendly search interface optimised for learning resources
  • Using the LOM standard to facilitate data integration
  • Using loose coupling and XML to enable integration

The LOM (Learning Object Metadata) standard; IEEE 1484.12.1 (http://ltsc.ieee.org/wg12/) standard was approved December 10, 2002 and defines a meta-model to categorize and describe learning objects. Although well received, and internationally recognized, adoption is still in its early stages, which again required the project to define the actual use of the standard in collaboration with local standardization bodies.

The following technologies and products developed the portal and search interface:

  • A portal framework; IBM Websphere Portal Server for the search user interface
  • A search engine; Verity, to index the meta-data for learning objects
  • XML and XML Schema for data interchange and validation

The demo will run on a standard web-browser; although designed to support all browsers; it is optimzed for a javascript enabled browser. The data interchange and internal processes can be displayed by a terminal emulator with SSH support, such as putty.

10 F-Script: Smalltalk Scripting for the Mac OS X Object System

Tuesday, 28 October – 11:00-11:45

Philippe Mougin, -, pmougin@acm.org

F-Script is a new scripting language based on Smalltalk and specifically designed for the Mac OS X object system (i.e. Cocoa). F-Script provides scripting and interactive access to Mac OS X frameworks. It aims to be a useful and fun tool for both beginners and experts, allowing interactively exploring, testing and using Cocoa-based objects and frameworks. As a Smalltalk dialect, F-Script provides a pure object-oriented environment that leverage Mac OS X technologies. It introduces significant innovations including a high-level model for object manipulation and a graphical object browser.

This demonstration will cover:

  • The F-Script interactive environment.
  • The OOPAL model, a new high level programming model which unify OOP and APL-like Array programming.
  • An innovative graphical object browser (aka. "Behavioral inspector") which supports interactive method invocation.
  • The integration between F-Script and Mac OS X frameworks.
  • The integration between F-Script and Mac OS X development tools (Project Builder, Interface Builder...)
  • F-Script Anywhere: dynamically taking control of running applications with F-Script.

F-Script is an open-source project sponsored by the European Smalltalk User Group and SQLI.

Keywords: Smalltalk, Array programming, F-Script, OOPAL, APL, Scripting Language, Mac OS X, Cocoa.

23 AspectJ Development Tools

Tuesday, 28 October – 11:00-11:45

Wednesday, 29 October – 12:00-12:45

Mik Kersten, University of British Columbia, beatmik@acm.org

AspectJ™ is a seamless aspect-oriented programming extension to Java™. It can be used to cleanly modularize the crosscutting structure of concerns such as exception handling, multi-object protocols, synchronization, performance optimizations, and resource sharing. When implemented in a non-aspect-oriented fashion, the code for these concerns typically becomes spread out across entire programs. AspectJ controls such code-tangling and makes the underlying concerns more apparent, making programs easier to develop and maintain.

The updated AspectJ development tools suite and Eclipse plug-in will be used to demonstrate new tool features including incremental building, bytecode weaving, crosscutting structure views, and debugger support. Some common crosscutting concerns of an existing object-oriented system will be mined and refactored into a modular aspect-oriented implementation. The integration of AspectJ into existing development processes will also be reviewed along with JBuilder®, NetBeans, Emacs, and command-line tool support. Installation of the tools and project setup will demonstrate how easily AspectJ can be applied to existing Java systems.

4 Automated Impact Analysis of Objected Oriented Software

Tuesday, 28 October – 12:00-12:45

Wednesday, 29 October – 15:00-15:45

Michael Hoffman, California State University Long Beach, hoffman@cecs.csulb.edu

Comparative Impact Analysis (CIA) and Predictive Impact Analysis (PIA) are two methods of determining change/modification impact analysis on object-oriented software systems. JFlex, an object- oriented software tool, implements CIA and PIA for Java systems. With JFlex, software maintainers gain immediate knowledge of complex relationships in Java systems such as inheritance and aggregation by using the Extended Low-Level Software Architecture (ELLSA) model. The ELLSA model is built by examining the Java system’s source code. The demonstration will show how JFlex allows maintainers to create the ELLSA of a Java system, perform maintenance activities on the system, and then create a second ELLSA of the system and compare this to the first in order to determine changed components and ripple effect impacts resulting from the maintenance activities (CIA). The demonstration will also show how JFlex can be used to predict ripple effect impacts on an unmodified Java system by creating the ELLSA for the system and allowing the maintainer to ask “what if” questions pertaining to possible changes to the Java system. The resulting analysis helps maintainers to determine testing requirements and which other components must be changed as a result of the proposed modifications. JFlex is implemented in C++ under Microsoft Windows using MFC to construct the GUI. Keywords Object-Oriented Impact Analysis Object-Oriented Maintenance Object-Oriented Software Architecture

6 Hardware/Software Codesign For Neo Smalltalk

Tuesday, 28 October – 12:00-12:45

Wednesday, 29 October – 16:00-16:45

Jecel Assumpção Jr., Merlintec Computadores Ltda., jecel@merlintec.com

The processors normally used for low cost or embedded applications are not well suited for running Smalltalk, so we created our own using programmable circuits (FPGAs). By creating the software and hardware specifically to work with each other it was possible to simplify both to such a degree that the resulting system is competitive in terms of price/performance compared to solutions with traditional processors, despite the inefficiency of FPGAs relative to custom designs. Both a 16 bit and a 32 bit hardware implementation of Neo Smalltalk will be shown in order to illustrate the cost and performance tradeoffs possible in this kind of development. The hardware is defined in terms of objects exchanging messages down to the lowest level, which is an interesting contrast to the traditional bytecoded virtual machines used for Smalltalk, Java and similar languages. Since the programming environment was designed to graphically show all implementation details, the audience will be able to see the issues mentioned above during a demonstration of the normal operation of the two Neo Smalltalk machines.

8 QuickUML: a tool to support iterative design and code development

Tuesday, 28 October – 12:00-12:45

Wednesday, 29 October – 16:00-16:45

Carl Alphonce, Dept. of Computer Science & Engineering, University at Buffalo, SUNY, alphonce@cse.buffalo.edu
Phil Ventura, Dept. of Computer Science & Engineering, University at Buffalo, SUNY, pventura@cse.buffalo.edu

We demonstrate QuickUML, a freely available tool which supports iterative design and code development by providing facilities to draw UML class diagrams, to generate Java code from such diagrams, and also to automatically generate a UML class diagram from a collection of Java source code files.

We developed the tool for use by students in our introductory object-oriented courses. We found existing tools inappropriate due to slow graphics and complex user interfaces. QuickUML is now used in several courses from freshman to senior level.

The demonstration will show QuickUML's various features, including how to draw diagrams, how to generate code from diagrams and how to generate a diagram Java source code. The ability to move between source code and diagrams facilitates the use of an iterative design-and-code software development process.

Our experience is that when students have a tool which allows them to easily express their designs at a high level and frees them from the tedium of repeatedly coding fundamental relationships they begin to think of coding in terms of the higher-level constructs. This in turn allows us to focus more on issues of object-oriented design and less on issues of syntax.

Educators or trainers teaching or using object-orientation in their courses can use QuickUML to support iterative design-and-code development.

9 The Generic Modeling Environment

Tuesday, 28 October – 12:00-12:45

Wednesday, 29 October – 16:00-16:45

James Davis, Research Scientist, Institute for Software Integrated Systems, Vanderbilt University, james.davis@vanderbilt.edu

The Generic Modeling Environment (GME) is a metaprogrammable, domain specific, graphical editor supporting the design, analysis and synthesis of complex, software-intensive systems. It is closely related to metaCASE tools such as MetaEdit+ or Dome. Over a decade of research in model integrated computing has led to the development of GME. The toolset has been applied to modeling and synthesizing several real world applications for both government and industry organizations.

GME has an architecture based on MS COM technology and is implemented in C++. The Core component exposes the domain-specific language specification through a set of COM interfaces. It has another set of interfaces for model access. All the other components, (GUI, browser, OCL constraint manager, software generators, etc.) are built independently around the Core. Model persistence is supported via standard database technology and XML persistence. The technologies applied throughout GME (UML, OCL, COM, XML) make it easily applicable and extensible.

The demonstration will focus on using GME to develop an integrated simulation framework for embedded systems. The UML and OCL based metamodels specifying the domain-specific visual modeling language will be examined. We'll demonstrate how the domain-specific environment is automatically generated from these metamodels. We'll emphasize how the target visual language supports such OO concepts as type inheritance and multiple aspects. The automatic extension of the model access interface will be shown. This interface makes extensive use of OO techniques such as inheritance. We'll show an example application, including its complex models and the automatically synthesized simulation and C code.

21 Feature Oriented Programming and Product-Lines

Tuesday, 28 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Don Batory, University of Texas at Austin, dsb@cs.utexas.edu

Feature-Oriented Programming (FOP) is both a design methodology and supporting tools for program synthesis. The goal is to specify a target program in terms of the features that it offers, and to synthesize an efficient program that meets these specifications. FOP has been used successfully to develop product lines in widely varying real-world domains, including compilers for extensible Java dialects, fire support simulators for the U.S. Army, network protocols, and program verification tools.

AHEAD is a simple mathematical model of FOP that is based on step-wise refinement, a methodology for building programs by adding one feature at a time. The incremental units of implementation/design are refinements that encapsulate the implementation of an individual feature. AHEAD models of product lines treat base programs as constants and program refinements as functions (that add a specified feature to the input program). Application designs are thus equations--compositions of functions and constants--that are amenable to optimization and analysis.

This tutorial reviews basic results on FOP, including general models and tools for synthesizing a consistent set of code and non-code artifacts by composing refinements (cross-cuts), automatic algorithms for validating refinement compositions, synthesizing product-lines of product-families (e.g., tool suites), and automatic algorithms for optimizing application designs (equations).

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Participants should understand basic concepts of object orientation, but no other special background is necessary.

Format

Lecture

Presenter

Don Batory holds the David Bruton Centennial Professorship at The University of Texas at Austin. He received a B.S. (1975) and M.Sc. (1977) degrees from Case Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. (1980) from the University of Toronto. He was a faculty member at the University of Florida in 1981 before he joined the Department of Computer Sciences at the University of Texas in 1983.

He was an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering (1999-2002), Associate Editor of ACM Transactions on Database Systems (1986-1992), a member of the ACM Software Systems Award Committee (1989-1993; Committee Chairman in 1992), Program Co-Chair for the 2002 Generative Programming and Component Engineering Conference, the Program Chair for the 1995 International Conference on Software Reuse, and the 1999 Workshop on Software Reuse. He has given numerous lectures and tutorials on product-line architectures, generators, and reuse, and is an industry consultant on product lines.

37 Dungeons and Patterns!

Tuesday, 28 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Steve Metsker, Reader, Thinker, and Writer, Steve.Metsker@acm.org
William Wake, Independent Consultant, William.Wake@acm.org

"Dungeons and Patterns!" is a hands-on tutorial for exploring and learning about design patterns. You can become a more powerful object-oriented developer by learning about these things called "design patterns." The "Design Patterns" book (by Gamma, Helm, Johnson, and Vlissides) explains what patterns are and introduces many of the most useful patterns, but many people find it difficult to learn by reading, and almost everyone improves through practice. The "Dungeons and Patterns!" tutorial lets you research, discover, learn, and explain patterns all at once, in a playful setting that is energizing and motivating while at the same time relaxed and fun.

In "Dungeons and Patterns!" you will encounter dungeon devices, creatures, and settings that serve as metaphors for design patterns. Your mission with your table-mates is to discover these metaphors, determine which pattern is at play, and explain the pattern to an Ahobbit that will accompany your party. The amazing thing about Ahobbits is that whenever they gain enlightenment about patterns (and utter "Ah Ha!"), their epiphanies magically cause further doorways and passages to open, letting you delve deeper and deeper into the patterns dungeon.

In a few hours of play you will become familiar with many patterns -- familiar enough to explain them to someone else!

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Attendees should have at least a little knowledge of design patterns, specifically those in the book "Design Patterns." Experience with role-playing games is a plus, but not necessary.

Format

Role-playing game

Presenters

Steve Metsker is a researcher and author who explores and writes about ways to expand the abilities of developers. Steve is the author of "Building Parsers in Java," the "Design Patterns Java Workbook," and the forthcoming "Design Patterns C# Workbook."

William Wake is an independent consultant and coach. He's the inventor of the XP Programmer's Cube, and the author of "Extreme Programming Explored" and the "Refactoring Workbook."

39 Enterprise Aspect-Oriented Programming with AspectJ

Tuesday, 28 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Ron Bodkin, New Aspects of Security, rbodkin@newaspects.com
Adrian Colyer, IBM UK, adrian_colyer@uk.ibm.com

This tutorial teaches participants how to apply AspectJ to enterprise application development using J2EE. It demonstrates some of the more advanced capabilities of AspectJ and how they can be used to address concerns such as security, caching, logging with Jakarta Commons, testing with JUnit, and more. The tutorial is based on a J2EE setting working with servlets, JSPs, EJBs and Web Services. It also compares AspectJ to AspectWerkz and JBoss AOP.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Attendees should have experience doing object-oriented design and implementation for IT applications. Attendees should have already experimented with AspectJ.

Format

Lectures and hands-on exercises

Presenters

Ron Bodkin is the founder of New Aspects of Security, which extends AspectJ to provide security and privacy management for enterprise applications, and provides consulting on AOP and architecture. Previously, Ron worked for Xerox PARC, where he led the first AspectJ training and implementation projects for customers. Prior to that, Ron was a founder and the CTO of C-bridge, a consultancy that built and customized enterprise applications using Java, XML, and other Internet technologies.

Adrian Colyer is an IBM UK Technical Staff Member with over 10 years of experience in developing enterprise middleware. He leads the open source AspectJ Development Tools for Eclipse project, and is also a committer on the core AspectJ compiler project.

41 C++ Threading: A Generic-Programming Approach

Tuesday, 28 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Kevlin Henney, Curbralan Limited, kevlin@curbralan.com

A lot has been written about multithreading, C++, and multithreading in C++. A number of different higher-level threading APIs have been proposed. Some are influenced by object models that are not necessarily appropriate to C++'s own idioms, and some suffer from looking too obviously like C API wrappers, in spite of their specific goal of API independence. In many cases, the resulting object model is less expressive, although far simpler and safer to use, than the underlying API.

This tutorial presents a refined model for threading in C++. The model is simple, idiomatic, and generic, and its thinking is more obviously unchained from the view of thread objects as C API wrappers. It entails a generic-programming approach that is more than simply using templates: it is orthogonal and open. Elements of the resulting thread programming model can also be realized in other programming languages.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Attendees should be experienced with C++ programming and should have some experience using templates, preferably based on the STL. At least basic familiarity with concurrency concepts is also required.

Format

Lecture

Presenter

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant and trainer. The focus of his work is in programming languages, OO, CBD, UML, patterns, and software architecture. He is a regular columnist for C/C++ Users Journal (online), Application Development Advisor (UK), and JavaSpektrum (Germany), and previously wrote columns in Java Report and C++ Report. He is also a member of the advisory board for Hillside Europe, the program chair for EuroPLoP 2003, and a popular speaker at conferences in the US and Europe.

5 JPie: An Environment for Live Software Construction in Java

Tuesday, 28 October – 15:00-15:45

Wednesday, 29 October – 15:00-15:45

Kenneth Goldman, Washington University in St. Louis, kjg@cse.wustl.edu

JPie is a tightly integrated development environment supporting live object-oriented software construction in Java. JPie embodies the notion of a dynamic class whose signature and implementation can be modified at run time, with changes taking effect immediately upon existing instances of the class. The result is complete elimination of the edit-compile-test cycle. Dynamic classes are precompiled and then execute in a semi-interpreted manner using an internal representation of the dynamic portions of the class definition. Dynamic classes fully interoperate with compiled classes. Consequently, JPie users have access to the entire Java API, may create dynamic classes that extend compiled classes, and can override their methods on the fly. Instances of compiled classes may hold type-safe references to instances of dynamic classes, and may call methods on them polymorphically. All of these capabilities are achieved without modification of the language or virtual machine. JPie users create and modify class definitions through direct manipulation of visual representations of program abstractions. The visual representations expose the Java execution model, while removing the possibility of syntax errors and enabling immediate type-checking feedback. In this demonstration, we will illustrate the central features of JPie in the course of constructing an example application. These will include dynamic declaration of instance variables and methods, dynamic modification of method bodies and threads, dynamic user interface construction and event handling, and on-the-fly exception handling in JPie's integrated thread-oriented debugger.

11 ATCT: a Java Framework that Offers New Approach to Developing Asynchronous Processes

Tuesday, 28 October – 15:00-15:45

Thursday, 30 October – 11:00-11:45

Serguei Mourachov, Velare Technologies Inc., smourachov@velare.com
John van Rij, Velare Technologies Inc., jvanrij@velare.com

Velare Technologies, Inc. will demonstrate ATCT (Asynchronous Transfer of Control Threading) – a Java framework for asynchronous method invocation. ATCT facilitates development of asynchronous long-running processes in Java, using well-known OOP techniques and design patterns. Traditionally when an application interacts asynchronously with an external environment, event-driven programming is used. However, this approach makes it difficult to develop processes with complex flow logic. Moreover, programming of sophisticated workflow patterns becomes almost impossible. ATCT allows transforming the event-driven programming style into a well-known sequential programming style, enabling the use of OOP for asynchronous process development. In addition, it is possible to develop a variety of new types of applications that require manipulation of execution context. ATCT introduces a new approach for execution context reification in Virtual Machine based runtime environments. ATCT uses a secondary bytecode interpreter to execute specially marked methods in a special mode, which allows to access execution context as first class object. The secondary interpreter is written in the Java programming language allowing use of ATCT on any JVM. ATCT’s functionality and capabilities will be presented by using slides and code samples. After introducing the concept using simple examples, we will show the possibilities for complex distributed architectures by showing prototypes of frameworks for messaging and web applications. Our demonstration is targeted to people who are interested in the use of VM-oriented mainstream OO languages such as Java or C#, for new types of applications. The demonstration should also be interesting for designers of Virtual Machines and new languages.

12 Generative Model Transformer

Tuesday, 28 October – 15:00-15:45

Thursday, 30 October – 12:00-12:45

Ghica van Emde Boas, bronstee.com, emdeboas@bronstee.com
Jorn Bettin, SoftMetaWare, jorn.bettin@softmetaware.com

The Generative Model Transformer (GMT) project is an Open Source initiative to build a Model Driven Architecture™ tool that allows fully customisable Platform Independent Models, Platform Description Models, Mappings, and Refinement Transformations. The project should result in:

  • a tool that fulfils the MDA promise for faster/more accurate/better maintainable application development,
  • a tool for industrial use,
  • MDA related research - which is encouraged and needed.

GMT resides as a technology project on Eclipse.org.

The demo intends to show the state of the tool at the time of OOPSLA.

The software is designed using UML modeling and implemented using generative techniques. It will be implemented mainly in Java. Links will be provided to other existing tools that can fill in some of the functionality required.

GMT will provide a related set of components that can be used by other MDA tool components, and will consist of four main components:

  • A mapping component that can combine two XMI-encoded models into one new XMI-encoded model.
  • A model transformation component using XMI as input and output.
  • A text generation component, using XMI as input and text (code) as output.
  • A workflow component that provides the required glue between the three functional components above, any additional user-developed MDA tool components, and popular IDEs/tool platforms such as Eclipse.

13 Semantic Software Engineering Tools

Tuesday, 28 October – 15:00-15:45

Alexander Paar, Universität Karlsruhe, alexpaar@ieee.org

During the nineties, object orientation of software source code made possible component orientation of applications. Recently, novel component oriented runtime environments have paved the way for service oriented infrastructures. Since there may be a considerable number of service providers, which offer very similar functionality, it tends to be difficult to choose the most appropriate service and to guess the appropriate operations by interpreting syntactic operation names as provided by state of the art Web service interface descriptions. We used semantic Web technologies like DAML and OWL for constructing ontologies, which present the meaning of processed data and provided functionality. These ontologies were used to annotate both syntactic Web service descriptions as well as object oriented C# source code. This demonstration introduces the set of tools that was developed in order to implement the idea of semantic software engineering. Web Services Description Language documents are annotated with semantic information using a WSDL Annotator. A Microsoft Visual Studio add-in was developed in order to annotate C# source code and to facilitate declarative service requests that may be embedded with common C# source code. A programmer may even dictate such requests using natural language input. The Microsoft SOAP toolkit was extended to preserve semantic annotations when C# proxy classes are automatically generated from WSDL files as well as when annotated Web service descriptions are automatically generated from annotated C# source code. Our set of integrated tools increases efficiency and productivity when developing and incorporating Web services using any object oriented programming language.

Xtreme Programming and Agile Coaching

Tuesday, 28 October – 15:30-17:00

Steven Fraser (Impresario), Independent Consultant, sdfraser@acm.org
Rachel Reinitz (Chair), IBM, rreinitz@us.ibm.com
Jutta Eckstein, Independent Consultant, jutta@jeckstein.com
Joshua Kerievsky, Industrial Logic, joshua@industriallogic.com
Rob Mee, Pivotal Computer Systems, robmee@ieee.org
Mary Poppendieck, Agile Alliance, mary@poppendieck.com

This panel brings together coaches to discuss all aspects of the practice: how to become a coach, choosing a coach, and describing what is to be an (in) effective coach. A coach watches, provides feedback, and suggests subtle direction. The coach may be more—for example—an architect or team lead—but that is a matter for debate. This session will be run as a panel with two open "fish bowl" seats, only one of which may be occupied by audience members at any one time. The panelists will defend their positions and offer feedback. Panelists were asked to offer their observations on three questions: How did YOU become a coach? What's the toughest thing you've had to do as a coach? What's your advice for teams looking for a coach?

14 MetaEdit+: Defining and using domain-specific modeling languages and code generators

Tuesday, 28 October – 16:00-16:45

Thursday, 30 October – 11:00-11:45

Juha-Pekka Tolvanen, MetaCase, jpt@metacase.com
Matti Rossi, Helsinki Business School, mrossi@hkkk.fi

MetaEdit+ is an environment that allows building modeling tools and generators fitting to application domains, without having to write a single line of code. The capability to define modeling tools and generators is relevant as it provides the ability to raise the abstraction of design work from code to domain concepts, and a raise in abstraction leads to an imminent raise in productivity, as illustrated by the past years' experiences.

In domain-specific modeling and MetaEdit+, one expert defines a domain-specific language as a metamodel containing the domain concepts and rules, and specifies the mapping from that to code in a domain-specific code generator. For the method implementation, MetaEdit+ provides a metamodeling language and tool suite for defining the method concepts, their properties, associated rules, symbols, checking reports, and generators.

Once the expert defines a modeling method, or even a partial prototype, the rest of the team can start to use it in MetaEdit+ to make models with the modeling language and the required code is automatically generated from those models. Based on the metamodel, MetaEdit+ automatically provides CASE tool functionality: diagramming editors, browsers, generators, multi-user/project/platform support, etc. MetaEdit+ is implemented in Smalltalk.

The MetaEdit+ demo will focus on showing how the domain-specific languages and generators are made; complete with several examples of domain-specific methods and related code generators.

Keywords: metamodel; domain-specific modeling languages; code generators

15 A Policy Based System to Incorporate Self-Managing Behaviors in Applications

Tuesday, 28 October – 16:00-16:45

Thursday, 30 October – 11:00-11:45

Hoi Chan, IBM T.J Watson Research Center, hychan@us.ibm.com

With the rapid increase in complexity of software systems and applications, it becomes necessary to develop tools to simplify the incorporation of self-managing features into applications. The use of object and component technologies, together with a policy system which externalizes business logic from an application, plays an important role in enabling systems with greater manageability and variability.

Current policy systems are mainly domain specific, and there is a need for an execution system which is flexible and usable across a variety of domains. Our policy execution system provides a framework which utilizes object and component technologies to separate the process of executing a policy into various components and processes. Each component and sub-process can be developed independently, configured and reused.

In our programming system, an episode of policy execution can be viewed as a composition of the following components: high level policy language definition and authoring, translation to executable code for the choice of execution mechanism, input and output, mappings of application objects and the underlying execution mechanism (rule engines, execution algorithms or strategies). Furthermore, we separate a high level policy into its various logic components: operation logic, priority logic, conflict resolution logic and each of these components can be developed and reused independently.

Our policy framework completely hides the programming details and exposes the interfaces only. In the demo, we will show how to build an application using the policy framework in various contexts with a single policy and modify the policy subsequently to illustrate the various operation of each of the components and features, and how an application uses the policy system to enhance its self-managing features. (The prototype of this system will be available for free download in 3Q of 2003.)

16 Using Events to Debug Java Programs Backwards in Time

Tuesday, 28 October – 16:00-16:45

Thursday, 30 October – 11:00-11:45

Bil Lewis, Lambda Computer Science, Bil.Lewis@LambdaCS.com
Mireille Ducassé, IRISA, ducasse@irisa.fr

An "Omniscient Debugger" works by recording all state changes in the run of a program, and then allowing the programmer to explore the history of that program— effectively going "backwards in time." Event analysis debuggers work by observing events as they occur, and allowing the programmer to write queries which will pause the program when matched.

Recently we have integrated the two techniques to produce an omniscient debugger which can use event queries to search the history of a program interactively. The query mechanism is designed along the lines of an EMACS incremental search.

The implementation of the system is in Java and records two types of events: method calls (and returns) and assignments. To our best knowledge, this is the first event model for Java.

A typical scenario is a quick sort program which neglects to sort one entry. An event search for the method call which should have sorted the entry ("Find a call to sort() whose start is less than the entry and whose end is greater") allows the programmer to get close to the bug, and the normal mechanisms of the omniscient debugger ("step forwards", "step backwards", etc.) allow the programmer to verify the exact cause of the bug.

In addition to the above (which the Prolog-based Coca system of Ducasse is capable of), it is possible to include both objects and the instance variables of those objects in the query (e.g., "Find a call to OBJ.sort() where OBJ.type is 'Integer'").

26 Time Conscious Objects

Tuesday, 28 October – 16:00-16:45

Thursday, 30 October – 13:00-13:45

Jorn Bettin, SoftMetaWare, jorn.bettin@softmetaware.com
Jeff Hoare, SoftMetaWare, jeff.hoare@softmetaware.com

In most business software systems the time dimension of business objects plays a significant role. Time is a crosscutting concern that is hard to separate from other business logic. We have developed a toolkit that allows existing business application systems to be extended with "time-conscious" behavior in a non-intrusive way by factoring out all aspects of time-related behavior into a framework and a set of classes that is distinct from the existing code base. The Time Conscious Objects™ (TCO) toolkit is currently implemented in Java™, but through the use of generation technology the toolkit can easily be made available in any language that supports polymorphism.

The TCO toolkit has been explicitly designed to allow non-intrusive and incremental integration into existing systems. Time-conscious objects can have a major impact on the quality and maintainability of applications by eliminating the complexity of dealing with the time dimension. This is the case for example in time-based billing systems, in the insurance industry, and in the modeling of "parts" in ERP and manufacturing systems.

The demonstration provides an overview of the architecture and the APIs that TCO uses to integrate with existing application system environments. Beyond that, the demonstration shows on the basis of one or more small example applications, how TCO can be used to raise the level of abstraction in platform independent models and in business application code.

TCO product development is work-in-progress and the demonstration is intended to be highly interactive, giving the audience opportunity to raise and discuss their specific time-dimension-related requirements.

Discipline and Practices of TDD (Test Driven Development)

Wednesday, 29 October – 10:30-12:00

Steven Fraser (Chair), Independent Consultant, sdfraser@acm.org
Dave Astels, Adaption Software, dave@adaptionsoft.com
Kent Beck, Three Rivers Institute, kent@threeriversinstitute.org
Barry Boehm, USC, boehm@cse.usc.edu
John McGregor, Clemson University, johnmc@cs.clemson.edu
James Newkirk, Microsoft, jamesnew@microsoft.com
Charlie Poole, Poole Consulting, poole@pooleconsulting.com

This panel brings together practitioners with experience in Agile and XP methodologies to discuss the approaches and benefits of applying Test Driven Development (TDD). The goal of TDD is clean code that works. The mantra of TDD is: write a test; make it run; and make it right. Open questions to be addressed by the panel include:

  • How are TDD approaches to be applied to databases, GUIs, and distributed systems?
  • What are the quantitative benchmarks that can demonstrate the value of TDD, and
  • What are the best approaches to solve the ubiquitous issue of scalability?

17 Redeveloping a High-Performance Computing FrameWork

Wednesday, 29 October – 11:00-11:45

Scott Spetka, ITT Industries and SUNY Institute of Technology, scott@cs.sunyit.edu
George Ramseyer, Air Force Research Laboratory, George.Ramseyer@rl.af.mil
Richard Linderman, Air Force Research Laboratory, Richard.Linderman@rl.af.mil

The High-Performance Computing (HPC) FrameWork is an object-oriented system that is designed to allow users to develop and execute HPC codes on geographically distributed high-performance computer (HPC) systems. The architecture was developed to support a set of image processing applications but can adapt to additional HPC application domains. Over the last year, an initial implementation of the system has been redeveloped using emerging object-oriented technologies.

The FrameWork's Kerberos-based client authentication services, initially implemented in C++, were replaced by a Java Server Pages (JSP) approach, based on the Globus Toolkit. Using the Gateway Portal project software enables future development of Grid capabilities for the FrameWork and establishes it as a Grid portal for HPC applications. Most client functionality is C++ code invoked by JSP Java Beans.

An HPC code adaptor object has been significantly refactored following successful alpha testing of the FrameWork. Initially, we only supported simple parameters for each of the HPC codes and ignored diverse sets of outputs for each of the codes. Redeveloping objects for two of the HPC codes to address these issues required a lot of expertise and understanding of the code which proved expensive. The refactored code adaptor object allows developers to focus on their input and output requirements. Using an XML description of input parameters and HPC code outputs further reduces the programming effort required.

This demonstration will follow a processing request through the system and then discuss C++/JSP/Grid portal client implementation issues and illustrate our approach to developing the HPC code adaptor object.

Keywords: Globus Toolkit, Grid, Gateway Portal, Refactoring, CGI, JSP, XML, HPC, Kerberos, Java Beans

18 Do You Still Use a Database?

Wednesday, 29 October – 11:00-11:45

Thursday, 30 October – 12:00-12:45

Klaus Wuestefeld, Objective Solutions, klaus@objective.com.br

This is the demo of Prevayler, the original free-software Prevalence layer for Java.

System Prevalence is transparent persistence and transparent replication of native business objects. Prevayler makes any old Java VM logically invulnerable for business objects without the need for pre or post-processing.

Queries run 3 to 4 orders of magnitude faster than using a database through JDBC even with the whole database cached locally in RAM.

DBMSs are the single most hampering force acting on the OO community. While they provide us with vital services, such as the babies born inside the Matrix, we are also pitifully atrophied by the restrictions they impose.

Instead of maiming our object design, Prevalence frees us to use the observer pattern among thousands of business objects or to run polymorphic queries on millions of them - some basic examples that would be way too slow, even on OO databases.

We are no longer restricted to the query language, algorithms and data-structures provided with our database.

Prevayler has been ported to several languages including Python, Perl, C#, Objective C, Ruby and a Smalltalk port by Kent Beck and friends.

Witness the transparent persistence and replication of an application running on Prevayler and discuss:

  • The simple concepts that make it possible;
  • The 350 lines of insanely refactored Prevayler source-code;
  • The shortcomings of the technology;
  • The adoption by the community.

Above all, you'll be able to shutdown your database and start using the full potential of OO.

Keywords: Prevalence, Persistence, Transparent.

20 Jazz: A Collaborative Application Development Environment

Wednesday, 29 October – 11:00-11:45

Li-Te Cheng, Collaborative User Experience Group, IBM Research, li-te_cheng@us.ibm.com
Susanne Hupfer, Collaborative User Experience Group, IBM Research, shupfer@us.ibm.com
Steven Ross, Collaborative User Experience Group, IBM Research, steven_ross@us.ibm.com
John Patterson, Collaborative User Experience Group, IBM Research, john_patterson@us.ibm.com
Bryan Clark, Clarkson University, clarkbw@clarkson.edu
Cleidson de Souza, University of California, Irvine, cdesouza@ics.uci.edu

Collaboration is vital in any team-based software development effort, and traditionally occurs in the source control repository or in applications outside the IDE (e.g. email, instant messaging). The Jazz project extends the IDE with collaborative capabilities, focusing on adding awareness, coordination, and communication among a small team of developers. Our goal is to provide easy, in-context, yet unobtrusive access to as much team information as possible. We demonstrate this in our prototype by contributing a number of collaborative plug-ins to the Eclipse Java development environment.

Teams and their members are shown with their online status and information on the activities they are engaged in. Each team has an associated group discussion board, one-to-one chats to discuss source code, and screen sharing facilities for joint debugging and code walkthroughs. Team members can define, assign, and relate activities, which include tasks and source control events, and these are automatically logged in the discussion board and linked with relevant source files. In addition to people-centered awareness, the Jazz project provides resource-centered awareness. Through decorators in the package explorer, a user can tell which files have been checked out, modified, and checked in. Markers next to code are used to indicate modifications, annotations, chats about a particular region of code, and associated activities.

Keywords: Eclipse, IDE, application development, integrated development environment, collaborative computing, collaborative software engineering, collaborative development environment, CSCW, groupware, Java

22 T++ : A Tool for Web Application Development with C++

Wednesday, 29 October – 11:00-11:45

Antonio Terceiro, Federal University of Bahia, terceiro@im.ufba.br
Christina Chavez, Federal University of Bahia, flach@im.ufba.br

C++ is widely used in application development, and there is no consolidated engine for web application development in C++. This work demonstrates T++, a tool for using C++ in web application development.

T++ works like JSP does for JAVA, and looks like other web programming tools: special documents have markup content, like HTML, mixed with C++ source code, which is executed when an user requests that document.

The expected audience for this presentation are software developers interested in using C++ to develop web applications.

T++ itself, the internal engine, is object oriented. The programming interface is object oriented too: documents generates classes that extend a T++ standard class, and can define methods, attributes and other members.

T++ is a free software engine that brings together some different techniques to provide a highly usable, efficient and safe tool for web development. Those techniques include shared memory allocation for C++ objects and dynamic C++ class loading. Running T++ requires a GNU/Linux system, an Apache web server, and GNU Compiler Collection (gcc) with support to C++.

This demonstration will show the basics of web application development with T++, including how to set up the T++ engine, how to program with T++, and some web development techniques.

Keywords: Web application development, C++

24 Variant Management for Embedded Software Product Lines with Pure::Consul and AspectC++

Wednesday, 29 October – 12:00-12:45

Thursday, 30 October – 13:00-13:45

Danilo Beuche, pure-systems GmbH, danilo.beuche@pure-systems.com
Olaf Spinczyk, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen, olaf.spinczyk@informatik.uni-erlangen.de

Software for embedded systems faces some special constraints not found in other domains. One of these constraints is a hard limitation on available RAM/ROM, processing power, and other resources. To cope with these limitations without losing the reusability of the software components, product line technologies are a promising approach. However, adequate tools for variant management are still rare.

In the demonstration we will apply Pure::Consul, a tool which supports the description of problem and solution domains of product lines, software families, or other variable artifacts in a highly flexible manner, to a realistic application scenario: a weather station product line running on a small 8 bit microcontroller with only a few KBytes of memory.

Problem domain modeling with Pure::Consul is based on extended feature models. The tool allows for integration of many different variability realization techniques through its customizable transformation backend. Thus, it is able to incorporate frame processors, code generators, or arbitrary other tools.

The implementation of the presented product line is based on AspectC++, an aspect-oriented extension to C++. We will demonstrate that by applying aspect-oriented software development, the number of configuration points in the code can be reduced. Both tools together form an ideal tool chain for embedded software product line development as one reduces the configuration complexity on the source code level, while the other helps to manage the variability on the abstract feature level and provides a mapping of features to aspects, classes, or other modularization units.

27 Visual SDLC: Improving Requirements Engineering for Object-Oriented Systems

Wednesday, 29 October – 12:00-12:45

Thursday, 30 October – 13:00-13:45

Marc Raygoza, Visual SDLC CTO, mraygoza@cmu.edu

In theory, requirements engineering solves many of software engineering's fundamental problems. The stakeholders know what the developers are building, why they are building it, when they are building it, and even to some degree, how they are building it. If requirements engineering resolves some of the basic communication issues between IT and the business, why aren't more companies actively practicing this discipline? In practice, requirements engineering is almost impractical without a commercial automation tool. The critics argue that the current automation tools do not convincingly demonstrate its value proposition, or fulfill the longstanding promises of the leading requirements engineering experts. This paper describes how the enterprise software development lifecycle management solution, Visual SDLC, addresses some of the outstanding issues of the present requirements engineering tools.

45 Test-Driven Development with "fit", the Framework for Integrated Test

Wednesday, 29 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Ward Cunningham, Cunningham & Cunningham, Inc., ward@c2.com

This tutorial introduces the Framework for Integrated Test (fit) and demonstrates its use in Test-Driven Development (TDD), as practiced in Extreme Programming and other agile development methods. Projects use fit-style tests both to guide programming and to test the correctness of the result. Test-driven designs are more easily "refactored," making it the only programming method that expects programs to get "cleaner" over time.

Short lectures will explain just enough of Extreme Programming to establish the context for test-driven design. These will be followed by live demonstrations and laboratory exercises. The labs will use simple Java, but the emphasis is on familiarity with the frameworks, tools and techniques, not programming. If you are unfamiliar with Java, you will learn enough just by watching to be able to complete some of the exercises and obtain all of the benefits of the tutorial.

Bring a laptop, or join someone who has one, to do hands-on exercises. Bring a wireless networking card to participate in additional "online" activities. Install Java at home to save time in class. Google "sun java download" to find a version for your computer.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Some programming experience with an object-oriented language is required (not necessarily Java). Familiarity with downloading and installing software is also required.

Format

Lecture, demonstration, and optional exercises

Presenter

Ward Cunningham is a founder of Cunningham & Cunningham, Inc. He has served as Director of R&D at Wyatt Software and as Principle Engineer in the Tektronix Computer Research Laboratory. Ward is well known for his contributions to the developing practice of object-oriented programming, the variation called Extreme Programming, and the communities hosted by his WikiWikiWeb.

47 Enterprise Application Integration with J2EE and .NET

Wednesday, 29 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Ian Gorton, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, ian.gorton@pnl.gov
Anna Liu, Microsoft Australia, annali@microsoft.com

Creating enterprise-scale information systems poses many challenges, as such systems require integrating multiple (legacy) applications in such a way as to streamline and automate internal business processes and provide web-enabled business functions. The underlying architectures for such systems are embodied in a range of diverse products known as Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) technologies.

This tutorial introduces EAI. It highlights some of the major issues in EAI technology selection, application design, and deployment. It introduces service-oriented architectures as a means of EAI, and presents some common architecture patterns for accomplishing EAI using J2EE and .NET. J2EE components covered will include the Java Messaging Service, Java Connector Architecture and supporting application server technology. In .NET, BizTalk, Web Services and various XML technologies will be described and illustrated. We will conclude with a detailed comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of J2EE and .NET technologies for EAI.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: A solid understanding of object-oriented programming languages, such as Java, C++, or C#. Familiarity with the key features of distributed component technologies and enterprise platforms (e.g., J2EE, .NET) is useful but not required.

Format

Lecture and demonstrations

Presenters

Ian Gorton is chief architect in information sciences and engineering at the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. His research interests include software architectures, particularly large-scale, high-performance information systems that use commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) middleware technologies. Dr. Gorton received a PhD in Computer Science from Sheffield Hallam University.

Anna Liu is an enterprise architect with Microsoft Australia. Her research interests include software architectures, patterns and best practices, and COTS software-evaluation and acquisition methods. Dr. Liu holds a BEng (with honors) and a PhD in computer engineering from the University of New South Wales, Australia.

49 Extending Enterprise Systems with Mobile/Wireless Applications

Wednesday, 29 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

James White, Fourth Generation, Inc., jpwhite_mn@yahoo.com

Many organizations are adding mobile and wireless capabilities to their IT infrastructure. This tutorial explores technologies, designs and issues associated with the development of mobile and wireless software applications. In this tutorial, we explore how to leverage and reuse existing object-oriented system code for mobile and wireless applications. We also identify the pros/cons and development issues associated with various software application solutions, including Java, .NET, Wireless Application Protocol (WAP), and Brew. We examine the device market and its impact on software development. Finally, we discuss what makes for good and bad mobile/wireless software. Not unlike enterprise software, mobile/wireless software solutions must be appropriately designed. Some of the design and architecture issues are shared with those of bigger object-oriented applications. Other issues, especially around user interface and database synchronization, require special consideration. This tutorial exposes the mobile/wireless software architecture and design issues and potential solutions.

Attendee background

This tutorial is targeted to those individuals exploring mobile/wireless software application development.

Prerequisites: Participants should have some familiarity with the basic concepts of software development and object-oriented programming.

Format

Lecture, examples, and demonstrations

Presenter

James White is Wireless Practice Manager and Senior Consultant for Fourth Generation, Inc. based in St. Paul, MN. He is the co-author of "Java 2 Micro Edition" from Manning Publications and has written several articles on mobile/wireless computing, Java and object-oriented topics. Jim also finds time to speak frequently at industry conferences and spoke about J2ME at last year's JavaOne conference.

51 Designing Reliable Collaborations

Wednesday, 29 October – 13:30-17:00 Afternoon

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock, Wirfs-Brock Associates, rebecca@wirfs-brock.com

Software need not be impervious to failure. But it shouldn't easily break. A large part of software design involves building our software to accommodate situations that, although unlikely, still have to be addressed. Once you've decided on the basic architecture of your system, assigned responsibilities to objects, and designed collaborations, you can take a closer look at making specific collaborations more reliable--by designing objects to detect and recover from exceptional conditions. This tutorial covers reliable collaboration design from A to Z. Topics include: resolving the mismatch between use case and program level exceptions, check-and-act and try-and-see exception recovery strategies, objects that are naturally suited for taking on exception-handling responsibilities, and how to streamline error checking by identifying trusted collaboration regions and designing for trusted and untrusted collaborations. We'll also present guidelines for naming exceptions and common exception-handling traps to avoid.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Attendees should be familiar with object-oriented design and programming.

Format

Lecture with many examples, case studies, and guidelines based on real-world experiences and projects

Presenter

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock is a world-renowned innovator in practical object analysis and design techniques. She is lead author of the new book, "Object Design: Roles, Responsibilities and Collaborations" (Addison-Wesley 2003). She invented the set of development practices known as Responsibility-Driven Design. Most recently, she has focused on ways to effectively communicate design ideas, designing flexible software without over- or under-engineering a solution, and effective ways to think through design alternatives. Among her widely used innovations are use case conversations and object role stereotypes. She specializes in the transfer of object analysis and design expertise through mentoring, consulting, and training.

Innovate!

Wednesday, 29 October – 13:30-15:00

Laura Hill (Chair), Sun Microsystems, Inc., laura.hill@sun.com
Rachel Davies, Amarinda, rachel@amarinda.com
Dick Gabriel, Sun Microsystems, Inc., rpg@dreamsongs.com
Harlan Sexton, Oracle Corp, hsexton@oracle.com
Kevin Tyson, Independent Consultant, kptyson@earthlink.net
David West, New Mexico Highlands University and University of New Mexico, dwest@cs.nmhu.edu

Freedom to innovate is one of the key motivators for many technical workers. Unfortunately, although innovation is often trumpeted as a key company attribute, it seems that many organizations struggle to provide the necessary environment—even those organizations whose original claim to fame lay in their ability to innovate. This panel will look at the barriers to innovation that occur in a variety of environments: large, well-established organizations, start-ups, academia, standards bodies and the open source community. Panelists will propose a set of technical and non-technical techniques that can be used to foster innovation in even the most lethargic or hostile environment.

3 Visualizing and AspectJ-enabling Eclipse Plugins using Bytecode Instrumentation

Wednesday, 29 October – 15:00-15:45

Thursday, 30 October – 12:00-12:45

Chris Laffra, IBM Ottawa Labs, Chris_Laffra@ca.ibm.com
Martin Lippert, University of Hamburg & it-Workplace Solutions, Ltd., lippert@acm.org

In the first part of this demonstration, we will use visualization techniques to show how Eclipse utilizes plugins and its extension mechanism to form a basic runtime infrastructure that allows the design and implementation of IDEs and general applications. We will show how bytecode manipulation techniques can be used to instrument all the classes in all the Eclipse jars and what possible visualizations can be the result. We will start with a bird's eye view and gradually dive down into the gory details. The goal of this exercise is to gain a better understanding of the inner workings of Eclipse and to address bugs and performance issues of given plugins.

In the second part of the demo, we will investigate aspect-oriented programming using AspectJ. We will show how one can combine the world of Eclipse plugins and AspectJ. One such example would be a logging aspect, implemented as a plugin. Using aspect techniques on Eclipse plugin jars, would allow for the development of aspects that modularize crosscutting concerns across plugin boundaries. We will present an enhanced version of the Eclipse Core Runtime Platform that integrates load-time weaving functionality of the AspectJ language into the platform.

Attendees of this demonstration will see the running systems and how they can be used. The implementation details of both the visualization techniques used in part 1 and the enhanced Eclipse Core Runtime discussed in part 2 will be described in detail.

21 Requirements Use case Tool (RUT)

Wednesday, 29 October – 15:00-15:45

Thursday, 30 October – 13:00-13:45

James McCoy, NASA Software Assurance Technology Center (SATC), james.mccoy@gsfc.nasa.gov

The Requirements Use case Tool (RUT) provides assistance to managers, customers, and developers in assessing the quality of use cases. In addition, RUT serves as a database repository for requirements developed as use cases. To ensure consistency, the tool provides a standard use case template to be used for all use case entry into the repository. Furthermore, RUT provides integration with Rational Rose, the industry-standard tool for developing UML diagrams. The tool also provides a series of metrics useful for calculating information about the relationships among the captured use cases. RUT performs use case evaluation by searching text and identifying risk indicators such as incomplete or weak phrases. The Requirements Use case Tool is a valuable resource for collecting, evaluating, and maintaining software requirements gathered as use cases.

RUT is a web-based, multi-user application that provides project team members with the ability to create, view, and modify use cases and related information for a particular project. The "dashboard" view provided by the tool gives managers and others the ability to quickly ascertain the status of a project by viewing various use case metrics. The tool was developed using multi-platform, open source technologies (PHP and MySQL).

All features of the Requirements Use case Tool described above will be demonstrated at the conference.

25 Building Compilers For Micro-programmable Graphics Processors

Wednesday, 29 October – 16:00-16:45

Yahya Mirza, Aurora Borealis Software LLC, yahya@aurorasoft.net

Even with the continuing downturn in the economy, one market segment, which continues to thrive, is the entertainment market. The games market has now even surpassed the film industry's profits. Existing general-purpose processors have been steadily extended (SSE, 3Dnow, and Altivec) to better support the game industry. Custom graphics processors or GPUs have been available for a few years now and these graphics processors are slowly evolving to generalized stream processors. Recently, Microsoft, and 3D Labs (Open GL ARB) have developed virtual execution environments to abstract the underlying graphics processors. Additionally new languages including Cg, HLSL, and GLSlang have been developed to target these graphics virtual machines.

The objective of this demonstration is to illustrate the issues involved in targeting graphics processors. I will start with a concrete example of a high-end film style "special effect" and then illustrate how it can be written in both Pixar's Renderman Shading Language and Nvidia's Cg. I will then disassemble the code and illustrate how the Cg compiler generates vertex and pixel "shader" assembly language. Using the "special effect" as an example, how the domain specific "shading language" constructs are mapped to the underlying GPU data types and instructions will be explained in depth. Additionally, I plan to discuss what underlying hardware mechanisms are needed in the GPU instruction set in order to add object-oriented constructs to shading languages. Finally, I will conclude with a discussion on targeting object-oriented virtual machine technologies such as the JVM, Squeak and the CLI to graphics processors.

55 J2EE in Practice: Architectural Variations in the Context of Enterprise Systems

Thursday, 30 October – 8:30-12:00 Morning

Markus Völter, independent consultant, voelter@acm.org
Arne Koschel, IONA Technologies GmbH, arne.koschel@iona.com

J2EE serves as a reference architecture for enterprise applications. It has gained widespread use over the past few years. For each part of a multi-tier enterprise application, J2EE provides both an implementation technology and a blueprint of how it should be used.

Unfortunately, it is not always easy determine which J2EE technology to use in a given context, or how to use it. This tutorial explores different architectural alternatives available to developers when working with J2EE and describes when it is and is not appropriate to use each one. These guidelines are taken from experiences using J2EE for real-world, mission-critical applications.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Attendees should have some experience with using J2EE and possess a basic understanding of what the different constituents of J2EE are used for.

Format

Lecture and discussion

Presenters

Markus Völter works as a freelance consultant for software technology and engineering. He focuses on the architecture of large, distributed systems. Markus is the author of several magazine articles and patterns, a regular Speaker at Conferences and co-author of Wiley's "Server Component Patterns - Component Infrastructures illustrated with EJB."

Over the last couple of years, Markus has architected, coached and implemented on several J2EE systems in various domains (banking, diagnostics, automotive) and on various scales (ranging from 10 developers and 400 concurrent users up to 120 developers and 50,000 users).

Dr. Arne Koschel works world-wide as Technical Product Manager and Product Specialist for IONA's Orbix Application Server Platform (ASP). Previously, he worked as independent Senior Object Technology Consultant and Enterprise Software-Architect with assignments throughout Europe and the United States. One of his major involvements (system architecture) for an Online Brokerage Application was selected as the major JavaOne 2001 J2EE customer success story. He is a regular speaker at conferences world-wide and author of many publications. He also cooperates with Universities, where he teaches courses in the areas of middleware and active databases.

56 Model-Driven Architecture

Thursday, 30 October – 8:30-12:00 Morning

Krzysztof Czarnecki, University of Waterloo, czarnecki@acm.org
Petter Graff, Inferdata Corporation, petter@inferdata.com

Today, application development remains a laborious process, with relatively little reuse or automation. Application programmers must manually map their high-level analysis models to target platform architectures, such as J2EE and .NET, and eventually, to code. Rather than focusing on the problem domain, they have to deal with the complex details of the target platforms. The analysis and design models - being just additional documentation artifacts - are often not properly maintained in the face of approaching deadlines. This makes the applications hard to evolve later. Retargeting an application to a new platform is almost as difficult as writing it from scratch. Model-Driven Architecture (MDA) is a framework for model-based development being standardized by the Object Management Group (OMG) that addresses these problems. In MDA, models are the primary source of an application. All other artifacts, such as code, tests, and documentation, are (mostly) automatically derived from models.

In this tutorial, we will take a critical look at the promises made by MDA and clearly distinguish what is possible today from the visions of tomorrow. After explaining basic MDA concepts, such as metamodeling and model transformations, we'll discuss tool requirements and review some existing MDA tools. We'll round up the tutorial with a demonstration of generating a complete J2EE and .NET application from the same high-level UML model.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Attendees should have basic knowledge of UML.

Format

Lectures and demonstrations

Presenters

Dr. Krzysztof Czarnecki is an Assistant Professor at the University of Waterloo, Canada. Before coming to Waterloo, he spent 8 years at DaimlerChrysler Research working on the practical applications of generative programming (GP). He is co-author of the book "Generative Programming" (Addison-Wesley, 2000), which is regarded as seminal work of the area and is used as a graduate text at universities around the world. He is General Chair of the 2003 International Conference on Generative Programming and Component Engineering (GPCE). His current research focuses on realizing the synergies between GP and model-driven architectures.

Petter Graff is Vice President of InferData Corporation. He has developed object-oriented systems for more than 20 years. At InferData, his focus is in object-oriented component development, software architectures and advanced implementation techniques for enterprise applications. He created one of the first model transformation tools (MCC) and is currently responsible for the development of InferData's next generation agent-based model transformation tool. Petter is also coauthoring an upcoming book on Model Driven Development (estimated to be published fall 2003).

58 Object-Oriented Modelling with UML

Thursday, 30 October – 8:30-12:00 Morning

Brian Henderson-Sellers, University of Technology, Sydney, brian@it.uts.edu.au
Magdy Serour, University of Technology, Sydney, mserour@it.uts.edu.au
Cesar Gonzalez-Perez, University of Technology, Sydney, cesargon@it.uts.edu.au

This tutorial introduces the UML (Unified Modeling Language) through the concepts of modelling. Having explained why it is useful to think about modelling before coding, the basic modelling concepts and notations of the UML are introduced, with focus on class diagrams and relationship modelling. More detailed topics are also considered: responsibilities, stereotypes, interfaces, roles, types, components and packages, dependencies, interaction diagrams, statechart diagrams and use cases.

Attendee background

Prerequisites: Knowledge of OO concepts will be beneficial; no knowledge of methodologies or modelling is required.

Format

Lecture

Presenters

Brian Henderson-Sellers is Director of the Centre for Object Technology Applications and Research (COTAR) and Professor of Information Systems at University of Technology, Sydney (UTS). He is author of eleven books on object technology and is well-known for his work in OO methodologies (MOSES, COMMA, OPEN, OOSPICE) and in OO metrics. Professor Henderson-Sellers has contributed as a member of the Review Panel for the OMG's Software Process Engineering Model (SPEM) and the UML 2.0 review team. In July 2001, Professor Henderson-Sellers was awarded a Doctor of Science (DSc) from the University of London for his research contributions in object-oriented methodologies.

Magdy Serour is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Object Technology Applications and Research at University of Technology, Sydney (UTS). He is the co-founder of SB the Software Group Pty Ltd (1982) and has had 25 years of experience in Information Technology, being significantly involved in Object technology adoption, process engineering, requirement engineering, modelling, implementation and IT consulting. At the moment, he is working in software process improvement and capability determination for object oriented/ component based software development (OOSPICE).

Cesar Gonzalez-Perez is a post-doctoral research fellow at the Faculty of Information Technology at UTS, where he works on object-oriented methodologies. He is the founder and former technical director of Neco, a company based in Spain specialising in software development support services, which include the deployment and use of OPEN/Metis at small- and mid-sized organizations. He has also worked for the University of Santiago de Compostela in Spain as a researcher in computing and archaeology, and was awarded a PhD in this topic in 2000.

Agile Management—An Oxymoron?

Thursday, 30 October – 8:30-10:00

Lougie Anderson (Chair), Sabrix, Inc., lougie@sabrix.com
Glen Alleman, CH2M Hill, glen.alleman@rfets.gov
Kent Beck, Three Rivers Institute, kent@threeriversinstitute.com
Joe Blotner, Sabrix, Inc., joeb@sabrix.com
Ward Cunningham, Cunningham & Cunningham, ward@c2.com
Mary Poppendieck, Poppendieck, LLC, mary@poppendieck.com
Rebecca Wirfs-Brock, Wirfs-Brock Associates, rebecca@wirfs-brock.com

"Self-directed team" is one of the mantras of Agile Methodologies. Self-direction means that the team's manager is relegated to a facilitator role with little or no influence over day-to-day activities. For example, Kent Beck has written that the manager of an XP project can do four things: ask for estimates on cost and results, move people around among projects, ask for status reports, and cancel the project. Agile literature in general says that managers shouldn't be directly involved in analysis, design, coding, testing or integration. They may (but only occasionally!) facilitate the process between the customer and the developers; and it would be nice if they provided food and toys to keep the team happy. It appears, then, that the agile manger is expected to hover on the fringes of a project asking a few questions and throwing in goodies—but with ultimate power (cancellation) in her hip pocket. This scenario makes one wonder. Do managers really matter to the success of an agile project? Are they superfluous? What happens when managers step over the prescribed line—does it mean that the end of Agile Methodology as we know it and as handed down by the Agile Manifesto? The panel will explore this ticklish terrain by answering the following questions: Why Agile Methods and managers don't mix. Or do they? What can/should managers do in an agile environment? Under what conditions are managers an absolute requirement in an agile environment? (e.g. Government applications?) Do good management techniques apply to both Agile and non-Agile environments? Is management a dead-end profession in an Agile world?

Object-Oriented Success Stories: "Learning from our Failures"

Thursday, 30 October – 10:30-12:00

Joseph Yoder (Chair), The Refactory Inc. & The University of Illinois, joeyoder@joeyoder.com
Ralph Johnson, The Refactory Inc. & The University of Illinois, johnson@cs.uiuc.edu
Steven Wingo, Southern Company, RSWingo@southernco.com
Ron Jeffries, XProgramming.com, ronjeffries@acm.org
Linda Rising, Independent Consultant, risingl@acm.org

Beneath the buzz around methodologies, languages and technologies, the last eighteen years at OOPSLA have seen countless object-oriented success stories, large and small. This fishbowl will provide OOPSLA attendees to bear witness to these victories, and tell these tales at last. Similarly we propose a follow-up fishbowl that discusses our failures. Just as much (if not more) can be learned from failures as can from successes.

What's so eXtreme About Doing Things Right?

Thursday, 30 October – 13:30-15:00

Steve Berczuk (Chair), Independent Consultant, steve@berzuk.com
Neil Harrison, Avaya Labs, nbharrison@avaya.com
Kevlin Henney, Curbralan, kevlin@curbralan.com
Joshua Kerievsky,, Industrial Logic, joshua@industriallogic.com
Linda Rising, Independent Consultant, risingl@acm.org
Ken Schwaber, ADM, ken.schwaber@verizon.net
Bobby Woolf, Independent Consultant, woolf@acm.org

Agile Methods are advocated as a way of producing better software. Advocates of agile methods suggest that practices such as keeping in close communication with your customers, frequent integration, and frequent assessment of project status will enable us to produce software that has value for the customer—quality software. It's hard to argue with that. But why is this any different than simply "good" software development practice? Why does saying "Scrum" "Agile" or "XP" grab peoples' attention? Why does it take a name for useful practices to be accepted? This panel will help us understand the role of hype in getting useful practices accepted or rejected. We will explore why it is that these good ideas have not been more widely used. Some of the questions that the panel and the audience will explore are: Why do we ignore proven practices until we see them packaged as a "method?" Can we do something different in the workplace or in school to teach these practices? Or is it the case that these practices are not universally good? This panel talks about agility in a different context than what is typical: we won't just discuss what agile practices are. We will explore why they are not more widely adopted, especially when not packaged as part of a "named" method like XP, and we will discuss why projects suffer even when the methods that can help them are well known. This panel will provide an entertaining and thought provoking forum for discussing an issue that is ever present in the world of technology: the role of hype. We concentrate on agile practices, moving beyond simply enumerating them, to discussing why they are not more widely adopted.

Application Servers: One Size Fits All ... Not?

Thursday, 30 October – 13:30-15:00

Gail E. Harris (Chair), Instantiated Software Inc., gail.harris@instantiated.ca
Jeromy Carrière, Microsoft Corporation, jeromyc@microsoft.com
John Crupi, Sun Microsystems, john.crupi@sun.com
David Leibs, Oracle Corporation, david.leibs@oracle.com
Fred Nagy, Solutions In Context, fred.nagy@solutionsincontext.ca
Martin Nally, IBM Corporation, nally@us.ibm.com

In the beginning there was machine language, followed by assembly language, formula translation, and eventually procedural programming, to organize the chaos. And then objects were introduced, to hide information. Soon Client/Server and multi-tier applications were conceived to separate data concerns from business logic concerns and user interface concerns. Later, these objects were distributed geographically to optimize hardware resources. And now, we have application servers, to simplify scaling up a system for large volumes, improved response times, impeccable reliability, and high availability. Application servers house the business logic, operating on data from a different server, and responding to requests from any source. But these Application Servers come in all shapes, flavors, and sizes. What is a developer to do? This panel will explore issues comparing application server technologies and questions about their appropriate use in different contexts.