Invited Speakers

At OOPSLA 2008 we are planning an outstanding set of six invited speakers with various expertise covering archaeology, anthropology, requirements engineering, software engineering and design, as well as language design. Every day you will be treated to a keynote in the early morning and another right after lunch. Below is the list of our excellent speakers with photos, biographies, and links to their blogs or homepage.


Invited Speakers

Mark Lehner

Mark Lehner

Ancient Egypt Research Associates

Room: West Exhibit HallDate: Oct 21, 2008Time: 8:30 - 10:00

Biography

Mark Lehner is recognized internationally as a leader in research and thought on Ancient Egyptian cultures and societies. He holds a doctorate in Egyptology from Yale University and has been on the faculty at the University of Chicago and a Research Associate at Harvard University. He is now head of Ancient Egypt Research Associates, Inc., a dynamic, international, non-profit organization that supports and conducts major archaeological research in Egypt's Giza Plateau and archaeological field schools in Giza and Luxor.

Dr. Lehner launched his career in Egyptology in 1973 when, as a year abroad student at the American University in Cairo, he started seeking the prophesied Hall of Records that some claimed lay beneath the Sphinx. Exploring for months around the pyramids and Sphinx, Dr. Lehner discovered that some of our notions about the ancient civilization along the Nile contradicted the "ground truth" evidence of the Giza Plateau. Since then, Dr. Lehner has focused his original and ground-breaking research on the people and the social context of the Pyramids and Sphinx.

In the 1980s, Dr. Lehner founded Ancient Egypt Research Associates, Inc., a nonprofit organization aimed to support and promote high quality archaeology and original research at Giza. AERA now fields a talented and diverse group of archaeologists and specialists representing Norway, Egypt, Germany, Great Britain, France, Holland, Japan, Poland, Portugal, Sweden, Germany, and the United States. The AERA team has been responsible for discovering the city where the Pyramid builders lived and for providing scientific evidence for life in the Lost City of the Pyramids. This new evidence supporting Dr. Lehner's research upended centuries of stubborn but ill-founded beliefs that the pyramids were built by slaves or outsiders, or, perhaps, even with the help of aliens.

In 2005, AERA founded the Field School, which provides Egyptian antiquities inspectors the tools and knowledge they need to ensure that all digs in Egypt are conducted with internationally accepted scientific methods that will protect the archaeological record for generations to come. Four sessions of the AERA Field School have been hugely successful, and now more than 300 Egyptian scholars apply each year for a mere 20 available seats. Today, Dr. Lehner and his team at AERA continue research at Giza and lay the groundwork for a new generation of scientific collaboration with the Egyptian government.

Social Programming A Pyramid, and possibly other large projects

Abstract

Over the last ten years AERA, Inc. (Ancient Egypt Research Associates) uncovered and mapped a de facto 'city' at Giza that housed, fed, and provided infrastructure for the builders of Egypt's early, gigantic pyramids. The architecture, precociously modern in its orthogonal layout, is a hierarchy of long, modular galleries comprising a large barracks system. Each gallery functioned as a coherent unit to house and feed people (probably young males) in groups called za, translated with the Greek word, phyle, literally, 'tribe'. Modular bakeries and other food production structures surrounding the gallery complex provisioned a work force whose members probably rotated in and out of the barracks. The pyramid builders scaled up by replicating many times over basic elementary structures of everyday life. The Egyptians' use of modularity gave their production and labor organization flexibility and robustness.

Settlement archaeology is more demanding than the archaeology of monumental desert architecture. We give every layer, deposit, and cut of a pit—any alteration of the earthly, physical record—an ID tag (an arbitrary number logged out of a running series, now in the 30,000s on our site). From each excavated 'context' or 'feature' we save all artifacts, all fragments of pottery, animal bone, charcoal, carbonized plant remains, chipped stone tools or flakes from making tools, and mud sealings that people applied (like wax on letter sealings of old) to string locks on bags, boxes, jars, and doors. This material carries its context number from the site to the field laboratory where ceramicists, botanists, zoologists, chipped-stone tool experts, and Egyptologists identify the material and enter their analysis into databases with hundreds of thousands of iterations for each class. GIS with our cross-linked databases illuminate distribution patterns that allow us to make inferences about the functions of different parts of the site. Our collections of objects and different classes of material culture cooperate to reinforce messages from the archaeological record.

Are ancient settlement patterns and technical systems—like the system that built the pyramids—passive reflections of a broad social order, of a tribal memory, or did they manifest from the thinking of a few key individuals? To answer these and other questions we continue to survey and map the stone monuments, the Sphinx and Pyramids, the tombs and temples, and, of course, the settlements.




Sonali Shah

Sonali Shah

University of Washington Business School

Room: West Exhibit HallDate: Oct 21, 2008Time: 13:30 - 15:00

Biography

Sonali K. Shah is an Assistant Professor in the Management and Organizations group at the University of Washington's Foster School of Business. Her research examines the social structures that support innovation and entrepreneurship. She is particularly interested in the process by which individuals outside of firms and research institutions access the resources and information needed to develop innovative ideas. Her primary work examines the creation and maintenance of innovation communities that support the development and diffusion of new technologies in fields ranging from software to sports equipment to medical devices. She is also investigating the processes underlying the formation of new industries and product markets. She was awarded a 2008 Industry Studies Fellowship and the 2006 Best Paper Prize from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, as well as the 2008 Thought Leader IDEA Award from the Academy of Management. She received her Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and holds B.S.E degrees in Biomedical Engineering and Finance from the University of Pennsylvania.

Community-Based Innovation: From Sports Equipment to Software

Abstract

The "community-based innovation" model has generated many large and small innovations across a wide range of product classes, industries, and even scientific disciplines. The model is based upon the open, voluntary, and collaborative efforts of users - a term that describes enthusiasts, tinkerers, amateurs, everyday people, and even firms who derive benefit from a product or service by using it. Open source software development is perhaps the most prominent example of the community-based model. Although often viewed as an anomaly unique to software production, the community-based model extends well beyond the domain of software. Innovative communities have been influential in product categories as diverse as automobiles, sports equipment, and personal computers. In this talk, we'll touch upon several aspects of the community-based model. First, we'll discuss the inner-workings of innovation communities. Second, we'll discuss how the social structure created by this model has cultivated many entrepreneurial ventures and even seeded new industries and product categories. Third, we'll discuss how firms can work with innovation communities. We'll conclude by reframing our view of the innovation process as driven primarily by the activities of firms and research institutions.




Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Wirfs-Brock Associates

Room: West Exhibit HallDate: Oct 22, 2008Time: 8:30 - 10:00

Biography

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock is an internationally recognized leader in the development of object design methodologies and is a consultant to enterprises of complex object architectures and designs. She invented the set of development practices known as Responsibility-Driven Design. Among her widely used innovations are use case conversations and object role stereotypes. Via her courses and conference tutorials she has taught object design concepts to thousands of programmers.

She is the regular design columnist for IEEE Software and the author of the classic text, Designing Object-Oriented Software. Her most recent book, Object Design: Roles, Responsibilities and Collaborations, was published in 2002. She also blogs regularly.

What Drives Design?

Abstract

Twenty years ago it was becoming clear that it was insufficient to simply teach programmers the syntax and semantics of object-oriented languages. It was also necessary to teach them how to think about and design their systems in terms of objects. But we didn't know what principles we needed to teach. What factors drove the thinking of a good object-oriented software designer? Based upon observations of productive Smalltalk programmers and their informal design methods we developed a set of principles called "Responsibility-Driven Design". These principles are quite simple: Maximize abstraction, thinking initially about object behavior at a higher level—responsibilities for 'knowing', 'doing', and 'deciding'. Distribute behavior promoting a delegated architecture. Hide implementation details so that they can readily change. Yet they have a profound influence on a resulting design.

Many programmers have found these principles useful as a guide for design thinking with objects, but these principles have been broadly applied to systems and component design, too. Since then, many software design methods have explained their approach by characterizing what drives their design thinking. We now have a design landscape where developers can be Test-Driven, Behavior-Driven, Domain Driven, Contract Driven, Feature Driven, or Data Driven, to name but a few. This talk will explore the principles and values behind various design practices and ask what a responsible designer can learn by looking across this landscape to find their common values and fundamental differences.




Janos Sztipanovits

Janos Sztipanovits

Vanderbilt University

Room: West Exhibit HallDate: Oct 22, 2008Time: 13:30 - 15:00

Biography

Dr. Janos Sztipanovits is currently the E. Bronson Ingram Distinguished Professor of Engineering and professor of Electrical Engineering, Computer Science and Computer Engineering at Vanderbilt University. He is founding director of the Institute for Software Integrated Systems (ISIS) at Vanderbilt University. Between 1999 and 2002, he worked as program manager and acting deputy director of DARPA Information Technology Office. During his tenure at DARPA, he established and directed research programs in embedded software design (Model-Based Integration of Embedded Software, MoBIES) and networked embedded systems (Networked Embedded Systems Technology, NEST). Currently, he is member of the US Air Force Science Advisory Board. His research areas are at the intersection of systems and computer science and engineering. His current research interest is the foundation and applications of Model-Integrated Computing, an emerging model-based design technology for distributed embedded software, which is used in a wide range of defense and commercial systems. His other research contributions include structurally adaptive systems, autonomous systems, design space exploration and systems-security co-design technology. He has co-authored two books and over 200 papers.

Convergence: Model-Based Software, Systems and Control Engineering

Abstract

System integration is the elephant in the room of large-scale system design. We would like to think that we can specify components, design them independently, and then easily plug them together to create complex systems. Unfortunately, history is full of examples that show we cannot reliably integrate complex components into complex systems. Our current technology cannot provide predictability for partially compositional properties, which is a common situation in all large scale system development. We are so far from a science of system integration that we generally consider this a management problem divorced from science and engineering; systems integration is almost totally absent from the engineering and computer science curricula. System integration is hard because this is the phase where essential design concerns—usually separated into software, systems and control engineering—are coming together and the hidden, poorly understood interactions and conflicts surface. The emerging technology of model-based engineering has the potential to make real change here. It offers opportunity for designing and integrating abstraction layers across design concerns using domain specific modeling languages, allows the development of semantic foundations for composing heterogeneous models and modeling languages and provides foundation and tools for relating models through transformations.




Lucy Suchman

Lucy Suchman

Lancaster University

Room: West Exhibit HallDate: Oct 23, 2008Time: 8:30 - 10:00

Biography

Lucy Suchman is Professor of Anthropology of Science and Technology in the Department of Sociology at Lancaster University, and Co-Director of Lancaster’s Centre for Science Studies. Before taking up her present position she spent twenty years as a researcher at Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center, where she was a founding member and Manager of the Work Practice and Technology area. Her research included ethnographic studies of everyday practices of technology design and use, as well as interdisciplinary and participatory interventions in new technology design. She has recently published a book titled Human-Machine Reconfigurations (Cambridge University Press 2007), which includes an annotated version of the text of her earlier Plans and Situated Actions: the problem of human-machine communication. The sequel adds six new chapters, looking at relevant developments since the mid 1980s both in computing and in social studies of technology. She served as Program Chair for the Second Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work in 1988, and for the first Conference on Participatory Design of Computer Systems in 1990.

Practice-based Design: Premises and possibilities

Abstract

Human activity involves dynamic interactions among people and between people and the material worlds that they inhabit together. The form of our everyday activities can seem method or madness, order or chaos, depending upon the perspective from which they are viewed. In this talk I'll elaborate the premise that our activities are in fact ordered, but through an ordering of a very particular kind. The implications of this premise for design are illustrated through examples drawn from interdisciplinary research at Xerox PARC beginning in the 1980s, in a series of projects that joined ethnographies of work and technologies-in-use with design interventions. Our ethnographic approach is exemplified in an early research project within a particular workplace which led, among other things, to a reconceptualization of what makes up an ‘information system’ that informed all of our subsequent efforts. The latter turned increasingly to interventions aimed at developing what I characterize here as a program of practice-based design, combining elements of workplace ethnography and cooperative prototyping in an expanding repetoire of generative iterations across system design and use.




Mark Jason Dominus

Mark Jason Dominus

Penn Genome Frontiers Institute

Room: West Exhibit HallDate: Oct 23, 2008Time: 13:30 - 15:00

Biography

Mark Dominus is best-known for writing the 2005 book "Higher-Order Perl", in which he adapted higher-order programming techniques widely used in Lisp, Haskell, and SML for use in Perl. While some people viewed this as a sign of severe derangement, others interpreted it as mere garden-variety stupidity.

Mark's other writing has appeared in IEEE Software, Wired, and The Perl Journal. His other achievements include setting up Time-Warner's first corporate web site, developing an online catalog, recommendation, and shopping system for Estee Lauder, and bringing "The Dysfunctional Family Circus" to the Web. He has taught programming and network security classes for large and small companies all over the world.

Mark has been programming since 1977. At present he is a senior project leader with the Penn Genome Frontiers Institute. He is intermittently at work on a second book, and still manages to blog regularly.

Mark lives in Philadelphia with his wife and children. His long-term goal is to read every book in the library.

Atypical Types

Abstract

Many of the shortcomings of Java's type system were addressed by the addition of generics to Java 5.0. Java's generic types are a direct outgrowth of research into strong type systems in languages like SML and Haskell. But the powerful, expressive type systems of research languages like Haskell are capable of feats that exceed the dreams of programmers familiar only with mainstream languages.

In this talk I'll give a brief retrospective on the history of type systems and an introduction to the type system of the Haskell language, including a remarkable example where the Haskell type checker diagnoses an infinite loop bug at compile time.