OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING, SYSTEMS, LANGUAGES and APPLICATIONS
 
 
Program
 


Program (2mb PDF)

Explore
  Invited Speakers
  Onward!
  Panels
  Workshops
Discover
  Research Papers
  Student Research Comp.
  Posters
  Doctoral Symposium
  Educators' Symposium
  Wiki Symposium
  Dynamic Lang. Symp.
Understand
  Tutorials
  Essays
  Practitioner Reports
  Demonstrations
Create
  DesignFest
  Lightning Talks
  FlashBoF
  Instant Arts School Exp.
 
Other Events
 
Resort Map (364kb PDF)
 
Resort Map (JPG)

 

 
Basket
 

view, help

"Computational Diversity, Practice and a Passion for Applications"

 

 
Page
 

Printer-friendly

 
 
  > Onward! > Breakthrough Ideas



Computational Diversity, Practice and a Passion for Applications

Dave Thomas, Bedarra

THE FALLACY OF THE "RIGHT" THING

The myopic industrial context that is being imposed on many of our best educators and their students is distressing. There is a misleading assumption that software engineering is simply a matter of knowing how to use the latest "right" technology.

PROMOTING COMPUTATIONAL DIVERSITY - OBJECTS ARE NOT EVERYTHING

Students need to see beyond OO and a particular OO technology. Computer Science is not just about objects, just as science is not just about chemistry and business is not just about accounting. Students need an appreciation and understanding of computational diversity. Different tools, techniques, and metaphors are not concepts that should only be offered in optional courses or limited to graduate students. It is not sufficient to make passing reference to this a survey course.

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION CONSIDERED ESSENTIAL

Students need to learn how to work with designs, specifications, and implementations produced by other people.

A PASSION FOR APPLICATIONS?COMPUTATION IN CONTEXT

Students need to see objects in context. Students should be provided with exercises based on an actual application that can provide an opportunity to provide a concrete substrate for abstract concepts.

REQUISITE VARIETY IN CS FACULTY

In the early days of computer science the faculties contained a rich diversity of scientists, engineers, philosophers, and even talented people without a PHD! Each of these brought their external experience context to the department and to the students. Today computer science departments are so pure that if they were a liquid the lighting through them would not be refracted into the beautiful rainbow caused by the impurities.

THE CHALLENGE OF BEING INDUSTRIALLY CURRENT

Many faculty have moved away from computation simply because they feel incapable of keeping up with what is happening in the industry. Of course they see IT professionals struggle to keep on top of the latest thing. Those of us associated with such innovations need to find ways to keep our educational colleagues current, by helping them understand the essence of each commercial wave without forcing them to crawl through the plethora of quick to market books, tools and APIs. We need to make an effort to show how this is similar but different from what came before, rather than the marketing departments claims of our latest "New New Thing" being new and completely different.

SUMMARY

We need to ensure that students?the potential software industry leaders of the future?are exposed to the concept of computational diversity. They need to critically assess ideas and products that are commonly perceived as being "in", while understanding the potential relevance and utility of ideas and products that are "out". A wide spectrum education will give students the knowledge to make technical decisions based on what solution best applies in a given situation.

 
.