OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING, SYSTEMS, LANGUAGES and APPLICATIONS
 
 
Program
 


Program (2mb PDF)

Explore
  Invited Speakers
  Onward!
  Panels
  Workshops
Discover
  Research Papers
  Student Research Comp.
  Posters
  Doctoral Symposium
  Educators' Symposium
  Wiki Symposium
  Dynamic Lang. Symp.
Understand
  Tutorials
  Essays
  Practitioner Reports
  Demonstrations
Create
  DesignFest
  Lightning Talks
  FlashBoF
  Instant Arts School Exp.
 
Other Events
 
Resort Map (364kb PDF)
 
Resort Map (JPG)

 

 
Basket
 

view, help

"Using Wikis in Software Development"

 

 
Page
 

Printer-friendly

 
 
  > Tutorials > All Tutorials

 : Wiki Tutorials : Tuesday : Tuesday Afternoon Tutorials (13:30 - 17:00)

Using Wikis in Software Development

Royal Palm Salon 4
Tuesday, 13:30, half day

 


 
7·8·9·10·11·12·13·14·15·16·17·18·19·20·21

Jack Bolles, Independent Software Consultant

Tutorial number: WT3

This tutorial shows how to use wikis in software development. We discuss the strengths of using wikis and how they are superior to alternative tooling, in particular with respect to ease of use, integration with other tools, configuration management, agile methods, and opening or limiting access to people out side the team.

We also demonstrate how to integrate wikis with other tools common on a delivery team, including project planning, continuous integration, bug tracking and integration testing (eg. Story Studio, Cruise Control, Jira, and FIT).

Finally, we provide some structure and templates for development, including stories, devevelopment tasks, testing, retrospectives and planning meetings.

We encourage anyone currently using a wiki to share a brief tour of their wikis, if available.

Intermediate: Should be software developers or managers.

Jack Bolles, Independent Software Consultant:  Jack: "I've used wikis to varying degrees of success and uptake on most of my projects since 2000. I've seen them be both highly successful, and barely used; both developer-only and project-focused; both organic and mandated. That's a cube of experience rather than binary."

 
.