OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING, SYSTEMS, LANGUAGES and APPLICATIONS
 
 
Program
 


Program (2mb PDF)

Explore
  Invited Speakers
  Onward!
  Panels
  Workshops
Discover
  Research Papers
  Student Research Comp.
  Posters
  Doctoral Symposium
  Educators' Symposium
  Wiki Symposium
  Dynamic Lang. Symp.
Understand
  Tutorials
  Essays
  Practitioner Reports
  Demonstrations
Create
  DesignFest
  Lightning Talks
  FlashBoF
  Instant Arts School Exp.
 
Other Events
 
Resort Map (364kb PDF)
 
Resort Map (JPG)

 

 
Basket
 

view, help

"Storytest-Driven Development"

 

 
Page
 

Printer-friendly

 
 
  > Tutorials > All Tutorials

 : Sunday Afternoon Tutorials (13:30 - 17:00) : Agile Development : Sunday : Testing and Documentation

Storytest-Driven Development

Sunset
Sunday, 13:30, half day

 


 
7·8·9·10·11·12·13·14·15·16·17·18·19·20·21

Max Baumann, Industrial Logic Inc.
Ken Scott-Hlebek, Industrial Logic, Inc.

Tutorial number: 15

Falling behind on writing your acceptance tests? This is a common problem. Either you don't have the right people to produce acceptance tests and/or you just never seem to have enough time to implement them. The result is a backlog of work and not enough coverage for the features in your system. The solution to this problem is called Storytest-Driven Development (SDD).This practice advocates you define storytests (automated acceptance criteria) for stories prior to implementing them. Writing the storytest aids both developers and customers in aligning their efforts. Storytests are textual descriptions of a test that are easy to read, modify and execute. Subject matter experts, analysts, testers and programmers produce tests collaboratively. Storytests may be automated using a variety of technologies, such as FIT, Ward Cunngingham's excellent Framework for Integrated Test. A key benefit of this practice is the design simplicity that flows out of starting all work with a failing storytest. This tutorial will introduce you to the practice of SDD. We'll explore example code and discuss real-world applications of this practice. We'll also discuss strategies for writing Storytests on 'hard to test applications'.

Intermediate: Attendees should have a working knowledge of Java and a basic understanding of test driven development.

Max Baumann, Industrial Logic Inc.:  Max Baumann has been programmer, coach, and trainer on small and large scale Traditional, Agile, and XP projects over the past ten years. Max is a capable developer who brings theory to practice by working side-by-side with teams to improve their collaboration, refactoring, test-driven development, and storytest-driven development skills. He regularly shares his expertise with organizations and conferences as a trainer and speaker. He is committed to refining his craft, and is passionate about making software development enjoyable for everyone from customers and programmers to the end users. In his spare time he can be found enjoying the outdoors, cooking and playing the mandolin.

Ken Scott-Hlebek, Industrial Logic, Inc.:  Ken Scott-Hlebek is an Industrial XP Coach. Prior to joining Industrial Logic, Ken assisted teams in their transition to agility by teaching test-driven development, refactoring, and evolutionary design. Ken brings experience as a software craftsman and mentor from a variety of environments, from small in-house teams to large outsourced and offshore projects. Convinced that human factors are the key to successful software teams, Ken is passionate about promoting the warm and fuzzy side of the craft.

 
.