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Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications
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  > Educators' Symposium

 : Monday

Techniques for Teaching

Ballroom C
Monday, 15:30, 1 hour 30 minutes
 


 
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If I had a model, I'd model in the mornin'
Kurt Fenstermacher
University of Arizona
kurtf@eller.arizona.edu

Despite the importance of modeling in producing high-quality software, modeling often receives scant attention in academic curricula. The recent (sometimes heated) discussion of the Object Management Group'sModel-Driven Architecture (MDA) has created an opportunity and offered the motivation for making modeling a more central part of the study of software designs. This paper discusses the rationale for modeling, how modeling is currently taught in one graduate program in Management Information Systems and some experiences in the teaching of modeling to masters' level graduate students.



Event-Driven Programming Facilitates Learning Standard Programming Concepts
Kim B. Bruce
Williams College
kim@cs.williams.edu

Andrea Danyluk
Williams College
andrea@cs.williams.edu

Thomas Murtagh
Williams College
tom@cs.williams.edu

We have designed a CS 1 course that integrates event-driven programming from the very start. We argue that event-driven programming is simple enough for CS 1 when introduced with the aid of a library that we have developed. In this paper we argue that early use of event-driven programming makes many of the standard topics of CS 1 much easier for students to learn by breaking them into smaller, more understandable concepts.



Activity Session: Framegames!
Steve Metsker
CapTech Ventures
steve.metsker@acm.org

William Wake
Independent Consultant
william.wake@acm.org

To help your students be motivated, active, and alert in class, it helps to include interactive simulations and games in your teaching. It takes a lot of preparation, though, to create new games for your classes.

Framegames offer an approach to including interactive content without wearing yourself out. A framegame is a shell into which you can load a lesson-of-the-day to quickly create an enjoyable and instructive game. In this hands-on session, we'll introduce two frames and four games, and give you the chance to test out the games. You'll walk away with a pair of frames that you can apply immediately to spice up your curriculum and energize your students without exhausting yourself!