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"Workshop: Revival of Dynamic Languages (RDL 2004)"
Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications
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Workshop: Revival of Dynamic Languages (RDL 2004)

Gilad Bracha, Sun Microsystems
Wolfgang De Meuter, Vrije Universiteit Brussel
St?phane Ducasse, University of Bern
Oscar Nierstrasz, University of Bern

In industry, static languages (such as Java, C++ and C#) are much more widely used than their dynamic counterparts (like CLOS, Python, Self or Smalltalk). So it appears as though dynamic language concepts were forgotten and lost the race. But this is not the case. Java and C#, the latest mainstream static languages, popularized to a certain extent dynamic language features such as garbage collection, portability and (limited forms of) reflection. In the near future, we expect this dynamicity to increase even further. E.g., it is getting clearer year after year that pervasive computing is becoming the rule and that concepts such as meta programming, reflection, mobility, dynamic reconfigurability and distribution are becoming increasingly popular. All of these features are the domain of dynamic languages, and hence it is only logical that more dynamic language concepts have to be taken up by static languages, or that dynamic languages can make a breakthrough. The goal of this workshop is to bring together researchers in (object-oriented) language design interested in dynamic language features and languages that do not fit into the static mainstream.