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"Design Patterns Revisited"
Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications
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 : Monday

Design Patterns Revisited

Meeting Room 3
Monday, 8:30, full day
 


 
7·8·9·10·11·12·13·14·15·16·17·18·19·20·21

Brian Foote, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
James Noble, Victoria University of Wellington, NZ
Kyle Brown, IBM
Dirk Riehle, Stanford University

http://www.laputan.org/dpr.html

Though Chrisopher Alexander's notion of patterns has been part of the object-oriented community since 1987, it didn't really come to the fore until ten years ago, in 1994, with the publication of the landmark "Design Patterns" volume by Vlissides, Johnson, Helm, and Gamma. The so-called "Gang-of-Four" (GoF) book described twenty-three design-level object-oriented patterns. It launched the modern patterns movement in computer science, and spawned the patterns community. One of the striking things about patterns was that they were distilled from experience and prior art, rather than culled from original research. Since the GoF book was published, hundreds of additional patterns have been added to the pattern canon, but for many, the focus has remained on design-level patterns.

We are soliciting position papers that address the following issues:

  • New pattern classification schemes and taxonomies
  • Ways of weaving existing patterns into full pattern languages
  • Alternative, even revisionist, presentations of design notions covered by existing patterns
  • Presentations of existing patterns as combinations or refactorings of other patterns
  • Papers that address the relationships among patterns, idioms, frameworks, and programming languages and language features
  • Attempts to better place design level patterns in the context of the broader pantheon of patterns